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Periodontitis and perceived risk for periodontitis in elders with evidence of depression.
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3620-5978
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
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2003 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 30, no 8, 691-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Depression and periodontitis are common conditions in older adults. There is some evidence that these two conditions may be related.

AIMS: To study a population of dentate elders and assess the prevalence of depression, self-assessment of risk for periodontitis and tooth loss, in relation to periodontal disease status.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were obtained from 701 older subjects (mean age 67.2 years (SD+/-4.6), of whom 59.5% were women. Self-reports of a diagnosis of depression, scores of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and self-assessment of risk for future tooth loss and periodontitis were compared with a diagnosis of periodontitis based on probing depth, and bone loss assessed from panoramic radiographs. Other systemic diseases and smoking habits were also determined and studied in relation to depression.

RESULTS: A history of depression was reported by 20% of the subjects. GDS scores >/=8 were reported by 9.8% of the elders. Periodontitis was identified in 48.5% of the subjects. Depression was associated with heart attack (p<0.05), stroke (p<0.01), high blood pressure (p<0.02), all combined cardiovascular diseases (p<0.001), chronic pain (p<0.01), osteoarthritis (p<0.001), and osteoporosis (p< 0.001) but not with periodontitis (p=0.73). Subjects with depression had a higher self-reported risk score for future tooth loss (p<0.02). No group difference emerged for self-perceived risk for periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a past history of tooth loss (p<0.001), self-perceived risk for periodontitis (p<0.02), the number of years with a smoking habit (p<0.02), and male gender (p<0.02) were associated with a diagnosis of periodontitis but neither measure of depression could be included in an explanatory model for periodontitis.

CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of depression (self-report or by GDS) is not associated with risk for periodontitis in older subjects but is associated with tooth loss and chronic conditions associated with pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 30, no 8, 691-6 p.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12059DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-051X.2003.00360.xISI: 000184336300003PubMedID: 12887337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-12059DiVA: diva2:721079
Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2014-09-18Bibliographically approved

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