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Bacterial colonization immediately after installation on oral titanium implants.
Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3620-5978
2007 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 18, no 4, 501-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Information on bacterial colonization immediately after dental implant insertion is limited.

AIMS: (1) To assess the early colonization on titanium implants immediately after placement and throughout the first 12 post-surgical weeks, (2) to compare the microbiota at interproximal subgingival implant and adjacent tooth sites.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Subgingival plaque samples from implant and neighbouring teeth were studied by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization before surgery, 30 min after implant placement, and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery.

RESULTS: Comparing bacterial loads at implant sites between 30 min after placement with 1-week data showed that only the levels of Veillonella parvula (P<0.05) differed with higher loads at week 1 post-surgically. Week 12 data demonstrated significantly higher bacterial loads for 15/40 species at tooth sites compared with pre-surgery (P-values varying between 0.05 and 0.01). Between the period immediately after surgery and 12 weeks at implant sites, 29/40 species was more commonly found at 12 weeks. Included among these bacteria at implant sites were Porphyromonas gingivalis (P<0.05), Tannerella forsythia, (P<0.01), and Treponema denticola (P<0.001). Immediately post-surgery 5.9% of implants, and 26.2% of teeth, and at week 12, 15% of implants, and 39.1% of teeth harbored Staphylococcus aureus. Comparing tooth and implant sites, significantly higher bacterial loads were found at tooth sites for 27/40 species after 30 min following implant placement. This difference increased to 35/40 species at 12 weeks post-surgically.

CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial colonization occurred within 30 min after implant placement. Early colonization patterns differed between implant and tooth surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 18, no 4, 501-8 p.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12057DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2007.01381.xISI: 000247904600013PubMedID: 17501978OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-12057DiVA: diva2:720991
Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2014-09-18Bibliographically approved

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