hkr.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Stress biology and immunology in Nephrops norvegicus
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences-Kristineberg, University of Gothenburg.
Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences-Kristineberg, University of Gothenburg.
2013 (English)In: The ecology and biology of Nephrops norvegicus, Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013, Vol. 64, 149-200 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus lives at low-light depths, in muddy substrata of high organic content where water salinities are high and fluctuations in temperature are moderate. In this environment, the lobsters are naturally exposed to a number of potential stressors, many of them as a result of the surficial breakdown of organic material in the sediment. This process (early diagenesis) creates a heterogeneous environment with temporal and spatial fluctuations in a number of compounds such as oxygen, ammonia, metals, and hydrogen sulphide. In addition to this, there are anthropogenically generated stressors, such as human-induced climate change (resulting in elevated temperature and ocean acidification), pollution and fishing. The lobsters are thus exposed to several stressors, which are strongly linked to the habitat in which the animals live. Here, the capacity of Nephrops to deal with these stressors is summarised. Eutrophication-induced hypoxia and subsequent metal remobilisation from the sediment is a well-documented effect found in some wild Nephrops populations. Compared to many other crustacean species, Nephrops is well adapted to tolerate periods of hypoxia, but prolonged or severe hypoxia, beyond their tolerance level, is common in some areas. When the oxygen concentration in the environment decreases, the bioavailability of redox-sensitive metals such as manganese increases. Manganese is an essential metal, which, taken up in excess, has a toxic effect on several internal systems such as chemosensitivity, nerve transmission and immune defence. Since sediment contains high concentrations of metals in comparison to sea water, lobsters may accumulate both essential and non-essential metals. Different metals have different target tissues, though the hepatopancreas, in general, accumulates high concentrations of most metals. The future scenario of increasing anthropogenic influences on Nephrops habitats may have adverse effects on the fitness of the animals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013. Vol. 64, 149-200 p.
Series
Advances in marine biology, ISSN 2162-5875 ; 64
Keyword [en]
Lobster, Global warming, Ocean acidification, Immune response, Oxidative stress
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11067DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-410466-2.00005-4ISI: 000321561100006PubMedID: 23668590Libris ID: 14581849ISBN: 978-0-12-410466-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-11067DiVA: diva2:645840
Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-05 Last updated: 2013-09-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hernroth, Bodil
By organisation
Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap
Zoology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 27 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf