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How to minimize children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure: an intervention in a clinical setting in high risk areas
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. (Profession: arbetsliv och högskola)
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
2013 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, 76- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Despite the low prevalence of daily smokers in Sweden, children are still being exposed to nvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), primarily by their smoking parents. A prospective intervention study using ethods from Quality Improvement was performed in Child Health Care (CHC). The aim was to provide nurses with ew methods for motivating and supporting parents in their efforts to protect children from ETS exposure.

Method:

Collaborative learning was used to implement and test an intervention bundle. Twenty-two CHC nurses ecruited 86 families with small children which had at least one smoking parent. Using a bundle of interventions, urses met and had dialogues with the parents over a one-year period. A detailed questionnaire on cigarette onsumption and smoking policies in the home was answered by the parents at the beginning and at the end of he intervention, when children also took urine tests to determine cotinine levels.

Results:

Seventy-two families completed the study. Ten parents (11%) quit smoking. Thirty-two families (44%) ecreased their cigarette consumption. Forty-five families (63%) were outdoor smokers at follow up. The proportion f children with urinary cotinine values of >6 ng/ml had decreased.

Conclusion:

The intensified tobacco prevention in CHC improved smoking parents’ ability to protect their children rom ETS exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 13, 76- p.
Keyword [en]
Children, Child Health Care, Tobacco smoke prevention, Passive smoking
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11060DOI: 10.1186/1471-2431-13-76OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-11060DiVA: diva2:645454
Available from: 2013-09-04 Created: 2013-09-03 Last updated: 2013-09-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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