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Job strain and stress of conscience among nurse assistants working in residential care
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University.
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0161-4795
2015 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 3, 368-379 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim was to investigate job strain and stress of conscience among nurse assistants working in residential care and to explore associations with personal and work-related aspects and health complaints. Background It is important to investigate job strain and stress of conscience, both for the well-being of the nurse assistants themselves and for the impact on the quality of care they provide. Method Questionnaires measuring job strain, stress of conscience, personal and work-related aspects and health complaints were completed by NAs (n = 225). Comparisons of high and low levels of job strain and stress of conscience and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Result Organisational and environmental support and low education levels were associated with low levels of job strain and stress of conscience. Personalised care provision and leadership were related to stress of conscience and the caring climate was related to job strain. Conclusion There is a need for support from the managers and a supportive organisation for reducing nurse assistants work-related stress, which in turn can create a positive caring climate where the nurse assistants are able to provide high quality care. Implications for nursing management The managers' role is essential when designing supportive measures and implementing a value-system that can facilitate personalised care provision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 23, no 3, 368-379 p.
Keyword [en]
aged care, long-term care, staff, work situation, work stress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-10904DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12145ISI: 000352537200011PubMedID: 23924400OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-10904DiVA: diva2:640234
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2015-05-18Bibliographically approved

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Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap IIResearch Platform for Collaboration for Health
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf