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Predictors of self-rated health and lifestyle behaviours in Swedish university students
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. (Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3113-6432
2012 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, Vol. 4, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lifestyle behaviours are usually formed during youth or young adulthood which makes college students a particularly vulnerable group that easily can adopt unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. Aim: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the influence of socio-demographic factors on Swedish university students’ lifestyle behaviours and self-rated health. Method: Data were collected from a convenience sample of 152 students using questionnaires consisting of a socio-demographic section followed by previously well-validated instruments. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics: t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression tests. Findings: The results of this study show that the lifestyle behaviours under study (physical activity, perceived stress and eating behaviours) as well as self-rated health can be predicted to a certain extent by socio-demographic factors such as gender, mother tongue and parents’ educational level. Male university students were shown to be physically more active than female students; the male students were less stressed and rated their overall health, fitness level and mental health higher. Female students were more prone to adopt unhealthy eating behaviours. Discussion: This study addresses gender differences and their influences on lifestyle behaviours; it provides both theoretical explanations for these differences as well as presents some practical implications of the findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 4, no 4
Keyword [en]
university student, stress, physical activity, eating behaviour, self-rated health, socio-demographics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-9306DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v4n4p1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-9306DiVA: diva2:527899
Available from: 2012-05-22 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2016-02-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf