hkr.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Is diet segregation between dabbling ducks due to food partitioning?: a review of seasonal patterns in the Western Palearctic
CNERA Avifaune migratrice, Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, Arles.
Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. (Akvatisk biologi och kemi, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2868-2210
Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Pavillon Vachon.
Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. (Akvatisk biologi och kemi, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap)
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 286, no 3, 171-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within the paradigm of resource-limited competition-structured communities, dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) have been used as a textbook example of how morphological differences, notably bill lamellar density and body length, may allow sympatric species to partition food and hence coexist. We reviewed all accessible diet studies from the Western Palearctic for three closely related dabbling duck species, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), pintail (A.?acuta) and teal (A.?crecca), and present a comprehensive list of the food items (invertebrates, seeds, vegetative parts of plants) ingested. To assess the circumannual perspective of niche separation, we evaluated size distribution of ingested seeds among seasons and duck species. There was a significant difference among duck species in mean size and mass of ingested seeds, as well as in diet composition, with the largest seeds consumed by the largest species (mallard) with the coarsest bill filter apparatus (lamellae), and the smallest seeds by the smallest species (teal) with the finest bill lamellae. However, no effect of season was found, suggesting consistent diet segregation among species throughout the annual cycle of ducks and over large geographical areas. We argue that the patterns of food size separation between the three species are compatible with the idea of coexistence under interspecific competition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 286, no 3, 171-178 p.
Keyword [en]
Anas platyrhynchos, Anas acuta, Anas crecca, mallard, pintail, teal, food segregation, diet review, niche organization, lamellar density, body length, assemblages, competition, community, waterfowl, size, ecomorphology, coexistence
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-9238DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2011.00870.xISI: 000300983800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-9238DiVA: diva2:516661
Available from: 2012-04-19 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Dessborn, LisaElmberg, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Dessborn, LisaElmberg, Johan
By organisation
School of Education and Environment
In the same journal
Journal of Zoology
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 76 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf