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"It is a different war to fight here in Sweden": the impact of involuntary migration on the health of refugee families in transition
Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
School of Social and Health Sciences, University of Halmstad.
2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, no 3, 292-301 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Involuntary migration and adaptation to a new cultural environment is known to be a stress factor. The aim of the study was to explore the impact of involuntary migration on the family health in order to identify specific health care issues related to refugee families in transition living in Sweden. Data was collected through interviews with 16 members of 10 different refugee families from Balkan countries, Kurdistan and Africa for which permission was obtained from the chairman of the local ethnic organizations in a municipality in the southern part of Sweden. In interpreting the material, analysis was made using a contextual approach with reference to phenomenography. The analysis resulted in four qualitatively different descriptive categories characterizing the health of the families: a distressed family living under prolonged tension; a contented family who leads a satisfactory life; a frustrated family who cannot lead a fully satisfactory life and a dejected family who feels deserted. Stressors seeking asylum, facing unemployment and changed roles, interacted negatively within the family. A friendly and understanding attitude from the host country was the main factor in promoting the health of the refugee families. Nursing interventions should therefore assist the families accordingly in order to promote the stability of the family system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 16, no 3, 292-301 p.
Keyword [sv]
involuntary migration, health, refugee families, transition, Sweden, phenomenography
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-7002DOI: 10.1046/j.1471-6712.2002.00089.xISI: 000177832200013PubMedID: 12191042OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-7002DiVA: diva2:345310
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-21 Last updated: 2010-10-27Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Facilitating a healthy transition for involuntary migrant families within primary health care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating a healthy transition for involuntary migrant families within primary health care
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The refugee families face a complex transition due to the nature of the migration. This exposes them to vulnerability in cohesion and family function. Primary Health Care Nurses (PHCN) and Interpreters in Primary Health Care (PHC) play a vital role in their promotion of health because migrant health care is mainly carried out within PHC. The overall aim of this thesis was to reach a comprehensive understanding of involuntary migrant family health in order to facilitate a healthy transition for the aforementioned families in Sweden from a systems perspective. These findings are based on interviews representing 16 members from ten families from the Balkans, Kurdistan and Africa (study I), 34 PHCNs (study II & III) and ten Interpreters working within PHC and originating from the same countries as the families (study IV). This study was carried out in two municipalities in Sweden. Contextual analysis with reference to phenomenography was used in interpreting the data in studies I-III. A qualitative method and contextual analysis was used in study IV. The Neuman Systems Model was used to unravel environmental influences in all the four studies. The findings of study I & II illustrate the families’ transition experience through four different family profiles respectively describing the families’ wellbeing: A distressed family living under prolonged tension; a contented family who leads a satisfactory life; a frustrated family who cannot lead a fully satisfactory life and a dejected family who feels deserted (study I). Further, a mentally distressed family within the asylum-seeking process; an insecure family with immigrant status; a family with internal instability and being segregated from society; and a stable and well functioning family integrated in society (study II). Stress factors such as living in uncertainty, having traumas, change in family roles, frequent negative attitudes of the host country and social segregation was detrimental to the wellbeing of the family. In promoting their health, PHCNs approached the families through: an ethnocentric approach, an empathic and culturally relative approach, and a holistic approach enabling families to function well in their everyday life (study III). From the Interpreters’ perspective, promoting health was to improve psychological wellbeing by: promoting positive thoughts of a future, promoting consideration of one’s worth and promoting stability of the family unit. Social interactions within the host country together with the recognition and appreciation of the families’ cultural values and beliefs, and competence and proper and elucidative information regarding the functioning of the host country, was considered necessary. Facilitating a healthy transition is possible within PHC. This can be done through cooperation of the family, with other health professionals, community and ethnic organisations. A model was developed in order to help the aforementioned. Competence in intercultural communication and family focused nursing is required. Adequate skills ought to be included in the education of nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Department of Health Science, Lund University, 2007. 69 p.
Series
Lund University, Faculty of Medicine doctoral dissertation series, ISSN 1652-8220 ; 2007:50
Keyword
contextual analysis, culture, health promotion, interpreter, involuntary migration, nursing, phenomenography, Primary Health Care, refugee family, Sweden, transition.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-7095 (URN)978-91-85559-28-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
, Lund (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-25 Last updated: 2013-09-30Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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