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Comparing working conditions and physical and psychological health complaints in four occupational groups working in female-dominated workplaces
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
Kristianstad University College, School of Teacher Education. (WHOLE)
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
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2009 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, Vol. 82, no 10, 1229-1239 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Dominant theories of working conditions and their effects on poor employee health have been criticized for failing to consider how psychosocial factors interact and how such relationships may differ across occupational groups. Goal This paper examines the associations between psychosocial factors and physical and psychological health complaints while at the same time taking into account differences between occupational groups in female-dominated professions. Method Four female-dominated occupational groups were included: nurses, health care assistants, cleaners, and dairy industry workers. The relationships between influence, emotional and quantitative demands, social support, back pain, and behavioural stress were examined using structural equation modelling. Results Results supported a group-specific model: the overall pattern remained the same across groups while psychosocial factors had different impacts on poor health and interacted differently across groups. The results also indicated links between psychosocial factors and poor physical health. Conclusion The study confirmed the importance of differentiating between female-dominated occupations rather than talking about women's working conditions as such. The study also emphasized the importance of considering psychosocial risk factors when examining physical health, in this case back pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 82, no 10, 1229-1239 p.
Keyword [en]
Female-dominated occupations, Multi-group analysis, Structural equation, modelling, Back pain, Psychosocial work environment, Stress, SOCIAL SUPPORT, MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN, JOB STRESS, MODEL, BURNOUT, GENDER, CARE, INTERMEDIATE, SATISFACTION, DISTINCTION
National Category
Work Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-5718DOI: 10.1007/s00420-009-0464-zISI: 000271200400007PubMedID: 19756696ISBN: 0340-0131 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-5718DiVA: diva2:286693
Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2010-01-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf