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Increased serum uric acid - a marker of non-gouty widespread pain?: a study of female patients with inflammatory and non-inflammatory pain
Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9283-5096
Sektionen för reumatologi, Medicinska kliniken Centralsjukhuset, Kristianstad.
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, Vol. 35, no 4, 261-267 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between reported chronic pain and the level of serum urate (SU) among women with various diagnoses of the musculoskeletal system. METHODS: Consecutive female patients (aged 20-70 years, n = 124), at rheumatology and rehabilitation practices, with chronic musculoskeletal pain of different origins were followed for 1 year after an initial survey of pain, lifestyle, quality of life, and disability. Repeated blood samples (including urate, creatinine, cholesterol, and glucose) were analysed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explain initial variations in SU level in relation to pain and confounding factors. RESULTS: The level of SU was increased among individuals with widespread pain (>5 locations) independent of underlying diagnoses compared to those with fewer pain sites (270.5 vs. 241.2 micromol/L). Serum creatinine, body mass index (BMI), the number of pain locations, and sleep disturbances independently contributed to the SU level and explained 43% of the variation in SU. Individual variation in SU during 4 months was low. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological data on the relationship between the extent of body pain and SU were confirmed in a clinical setting. Besides known factors such as impaired renal function and obesity, widespread pain and sleep disturbances were related to an increase in SU. Medication and alcohol intake could not explain the findings. Longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate whether the level of SU has any implications for the prognosis of chronic pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 35, no 4, 261-267 p.
Keyword [en]
uric acid, chronic pain, women
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-887DOI: 10.1080/03009740600844779ISI: 000240435000002PubMedID: 16882588OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-887DiVA: diva2:222657
Available from: 2009-06-09 Created: 2009-06-09 Last updated: 2014-01-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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