hkr.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Attention and personality in augmenting/reducing of visual evoked potentials
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University of Lund.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University of Lund.
Department of Psychiatry, University of Lund.
1990 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1243-1254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Earlier research has shown that extraverts tend to increase their visual evoked potential amplitudes with increasing light intensity (augmenting), while introverts reach their maximum amplitude at lower intensities (reducing). The evoked response has normally been measured from association areas of the brain (at the vertex). The present study measured VEP amplitudes over visual cortex and at the vertex, using four light intensities in two conditions, where attention was either directed towards the light stimuli, or away from them by a concurrent auditory task. Forty subjects were classified as extraverts or introverts based on the Eysenck Personality Inventory. The results show that attention interacted significantly with extraversion. Introverts exhibited a narrower focus of attention, with higher amplitudes and amplitude-intensity functions when attending to the light flashes and lower when distracted. Extraverts showed smaller differences between conditions, indicating a more evenly distributed attention. Higher arousal in introverts is the probable cause of their narrower focus of attention. There were marked differences in the distribution of activity between vertex and occipital cortex. Introverts showed relatively stronger occipital responses and extraverts stronger vertex responses across all intensities and in both conditions. The predisposition for mainly perceptual responses to aversive stimuli in introverts, and for general alerting and motor preparatory responses in extraverts, are interpreted as supportive of Brebner & Cooper's hypothesis that introverts are "geared to inspect" and extraverts are "geared to respond".

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1990. Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1243-1254
National Category
Psychology Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-680DOI: 10.1016/0191-8869(90)90151-GISI: A1990EK00100008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-680DiVA, id: diva2:209314
Available from: 2009-03-24 Created: 2009-03-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(817 kB)307 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 817 kBChecksum SHA-512
c1cdf40fca8ead0f3aeed4fd452a448a56932a0a7d83e47e653319ae2780065d8774dbdb6e520b5ab7712f9f70b377141b6e3c19d47aa40f60e4817cbe7b2ebd
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text
In the same journal
Personality and Individual Differences
PsychologySocial Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 307 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 75 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf