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Dressing-related pain in patients with chronic wounds: an international patient perspective
Department of Wound Healing, School of Medicine, Cardiff University.
Department of Wound Healing, School of Medicine, Cardiff University.
Department of Wound Healing, School of Medicine, Cardiff University.
Dienst Huidziekten, UZ Gent.
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2008 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 159-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This cross-sectional international survey assessed patients' perceptions of their wound pain. A total of 2018 patients (57% female) from 15 different countries with a mean age of 68.6 years (SD = 15.4) participated. The wounds were categorised into ten different types with a mean wound duration of 19.6 months (SD = 51.8). For 2018 patients, 3361 dressings/compression systems were being used, with antimicrobials being reported most frequently (n= 605). Frequency of wound-related pain was reported as 32.2%, 'never' or 'rarely', 31.1%, 'quite often' and 36.6%, 'most' or 'all of the time', with venous and arterial ulcers associated with more frequent pain (P= 0.002). All patients reported that 'the wound itself' was the most painful location (n= 1840). When asked if they experienced dressing-related pain, 286 (14.7%) replied 'most of the time' and 334 (17.2%) reported pain 'all of the time'; venous, mixed and arterial ulcers were associated with more frequent pain at dressing change (P < 0.001). Eight hundred and twelve (40.2%) patients reported that it took <1 hour for the pain to subside after a dressing change, for 449 (22.2%) it took 1-2 hours, for 192 (9.5%) it took 3-5 hours and for 154 (7.6%) patients it took more than 5 hours. Pain intensity was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) (0-100) giving a mean score of 44.5 (SD = 30.5, n= 1981). Of the 1141 who reported that they generally took pain relief, 21% indicated that they did not feel it was effective. Patients were asked to rate six symptoms associated with living with a chronic wound; 'pain' was given the highest mean score of 3.1 (n= 1898). In terms of different types of daily activities, 'overdoing things' was associated with the highest mean score (mean = 2.6, n= 1916). During the stages of the dressing change procedure; 'touching/handling the wound' was given the highest mean score of 2.9, followed by cleansing and dressing removal (n= 1944). One thousand four hundred and eighty-five (80.15%) patients responded that they liked to be actively involved in their dressing changes, 1141 (58.15%) responded that they were concerned about the long-term side-effects of medication, 790 (40.3%) of patient indicated that the pain at dressing change was the worst part of living with a wound. This study adds substantially to our knowledge of how patients experience wound pain and gives us the opportunity to explore cultural differences in more detail.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 5, no 2, p. 159-171
National Category
Nursing Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-164DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2008.00471.xPubMedID: 18494622OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-164DiVA, id: diva2:159638
Available from: 2009-02-09 Created: 2009-02-09 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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