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Nurses and non-pharmacological pain management in palliative care: A Qualitative study
Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of the study was to explore the experiences and views of nurses on the use of non-pharmacological therapies of chronic pain management in palliative care patients.

Background

Non-pharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular because of limited effectiveness of pharmacological management of chronic pain. Therefore, nurses’ knowledge of non-pharmacological therapies is essential in palliative care.

Design

A qualitative exploratory research approach was used in the study to describe and clarify in-depth information about nurses’ experiences.

Methods

The study used semi-structured interviews involving 15 nurses who were purposefully sampled. Data was analysed through inductive content analysis.

Results

The results comprised four categories: Building and sustaining favourable therapeutic relationship: Experiences of nurses showed that creating conducive environment for nurse-patient engagement was vital in pain management. Recognising diversity of patient’s needs: The view was that non-pharmacological therapies worked better if patients were individualised. Incorporating significant others: Results revealed that nurses needed patient’s close friends, church, and family in patient’s pain management. Recognising existence of barriers: Barriers such as patient’s cooperation, nurses’ knowledge, and economic factors limited adequate non-pharmacological pain management.

Conclusion

Nurses view the use of non-pharmacological therapies of chronic pain management in palliative care patients as beneficial especially if nurse-related and patient-related barriers are addressed.Relevance to clinical practiceThe study holds the perspective that non-pharmacological therapies in palliative care require nurses to be versatile in managing chronic pain of their patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Nurses’ experience, qualitative exploratory research, non-pharmacological, pain management, palliative care, Zambia
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-20430OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-20430DiVA, id: diva2:1396029
Educational program
Masterprogram Integrerad hälsovetenskap
Uppsok
Medicine
Supervisors
Examiners
Note

Only abstract due to publishing of article.

Available from: 2020-02-25 Created: 2020-02-25 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf