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Saliva secretion and swallowing: impact of different types of food and drink on subsequent intake
Danmark.
Danmark.
Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7249-2628
2020 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oral processing of food is important for eating and digestion in order to gain energy and nutrients. Due to disease, injury, or aging, individuals may experience difficulties in this process. These difficulties often lead to dysphagia, which is associated with malnutrition. Thus, it is of importance to find solutions and strategies to enable food intake. It is well known that sour and/or carbonated foods and drinks increase saliva secretion and trigger the swallowing reflex. However, knowledge regarding how subsequent food intake is impacted is lacking. The aim of this study was to clarify whether sour and/or carbonated foods and drinks had subsequent impacts on swallowing function. Twelve healthy participants evaluated eleven foods and drinks in terms of their ability to increase saliva production and ease the swallowing of subsequent food. Results showed that sourness and carbonation had positive impacts on saliva secretion and swallowing. No correlation was found between the pH/sourness of the foods and the ease of swallowing them. It was concluded that the ingestion of cherry tomatoes, natural yoghurt, and, in particular, citrus juice made swallowing of a neutral cracker easier. These results may be used to increase food intake among dysphagia patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-9
Keywords [en]
food oral processing; nutrition; malnutrition; ease of swallow
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-20286DOI: 10.3390/nu12010256ISI: 000516825500256OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-20286DiVA, id: diva2:1387353
Projects
Tugga och svälj -ett koncept för ökad hälsa och välmående bland äldre
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-00305Available from: 2020-01-21 Created: 2020-01-21 Last updated: 2020-04-02Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/1/256

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Wendin, Karin

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Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL)Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap
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