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An evaluation of current services available for people diagnosed with head and neck cancer in the UK (2009-2010).
England.
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2012 (English)In: Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0936-6555, E-ISSN 1433-2981, Vol. 24, no 10, p. e187-92, article id S0936-6555(12)00193-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To evaluate current care and service provision for people with head and neck cancer in the UK.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Self-report questionnaires for cancer networks, clinical leads of oncology units and leads for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) were designed. These questionnaires were based on a previous survey. Questionnaires were sent out between 2009 and 2010.

RESULTS: Questionnaires were received from all networks (n = 37), most oncology units (48 of 53) and most MDTs (51 of 63). Care for people with head and neck cancer is increasingly being provided by a centralised MDT. The membership of these teams varies; facilities available for team meetings are fit for purpose in most cases. MDTs are meeting frequently (weekly meetings in 96%) and discussing on average 18 cases at each meeting (95% confidence interval 15-21 cases). Most oncologists have access to all common anti-cancer drugs and most have access to all forms of radiotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is not yet available in some oncology units (28%). A small number of units have only one oncologist (13%). Despite audit and research being part of the rationale for MDT working, regular discussion of morbidity and mortality is unusual (40%) and use of a database to record decisions is not universal. Only seven centres record decisions into the Data for Head and Neck Oncology database. Reported recruitment to studies is generally low (<2% of cases enrolled in studies in 62%).

CONCLUSIONS: Head and neck cancer care is increasingly provided through a centralised MDT. Increased resources and further changes in practice are required to implement current National Health Service cancer policy. Teams need to improve recording of their decision-making, discuss morbidity and mortality and support recruitment to clinical studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 24, no 10, p. e187-92, article id S0936-6555(12)00193-8
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19510DOI: 10.1016/j.clon.2012.07.005PubMedID: 22858437OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-19510DiVA, id: diva2:1329845
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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