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Meeting the needs of low-achieving students in Sweden: an interview study
Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). (LISMA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3251-6082
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education: Special Educational Needs, Vol. 3, no 63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 1994, a major curriculum reform was implemented in Sweden. A norm-referenced grading system was replaced by national goals and performance standards. The intention was that students not reaching the minimum standards would be identified and support provided. This optimistic vision has not been entirely realized. In 2017, 25.9% of all Swedish students graduated from compulsory school without receiving a passing grade in all subjects. To understand how students at risk of not receiving passing grades are identified and provided with support, interviews have been conducted at 10 Swedish schools. Findings suggest that the schools in the sample are successful in identifying students in need of support, but not necessarily in identifying the specific needs of individual students. The identification may also differ between students with learning difficulties and students with behavioral problems. Furthermore, the findings suggest that schools and teachers in the sample have different approaches when providing support to low-achieving students. This support can be categorized as supporting and relational, simplifying, or general and practical. These approaches, in turn, may provide different opportunities for students’ engagement with schoolwork and eventually their performance. By discussing the findings in relation to self-determination theory and self-efficacy, the combination of challenging tasks and scaffolding support, as well as providing structure in combination with caring relationships, are identified as important facilitators of increased student motivation and effort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 3, no 63
Keywords [en]
Grading, low-achieving students, special education, support, self-determination theory
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18446DOI: 10.3389/feduc.2018.00063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-18446DiVA, id: diva2:1237817
Available from: 2018-08-10 Created: 2018-08-10 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf