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Insufficient sleep is associated with obesity and excessive screen time amongst ten-year-old children in Sweden
Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1643-0171
Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1424-8336
Lund University.
Lund University.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This study investigated sleep, television, computer habits, and obesity in school-age children.

DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional self-report survey of 1260 children in grade 4 (mean age, 10.1) living in southern Sweden (49.1% boys). The heights and weights of 1097 (87.1%) of the children were recorded. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and multiple logistic regression were employed.

RESULTS: The median length of self-reported sleep on weeknights was 9.5h. Approximately 40% of the children reported receiving <9h of sleep. The median bedtime was 9PM (21:00). On weekends, the median bedtime was 1 h later, and they delayed getting up by 1.5h. The median time spent watching TV and using a computer was 1 h each. The prevalence of being overweight (including obesity) was 18%. Insufficient sleep (<9h) was associated with being overweight, watching TV, or using a computer for two or more hours each day, difficulty falling asleep, and being tired at school.

CONCLUSIONS: School-age children who receive less sleep are more likely to be overweight and report excessive television and computer use. A strong and urgent need exists to highlight the importance of healthy sleep and media habits. It is challenging for pediatric nurses and school nurses to teach children and their families about healthy sleep and media habits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
Child, Computer use, Obesity, Overweight, Sleep, Television viewing
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17638DOI: 10.1016/j.pedn.2017.11.009PubMedID: 29157744OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-17638DiVA: diva2:1160579
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved

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Research Platform for Collaboration for HealthAvdelningen för SjuksköterskeutbildningarnaResearch Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO)
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Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families
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