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Worldmaking: designing for audience participation, immersion and interaction in virtual and real spaces
Tyskland.
Tyskland.
Tyskland.
Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Department of Design. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, DARC research environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1234-6757
2019 (English)In: Interactivity, game creation, design, learning, and innovation: 7th EAI International Conference, ArtsIT 2018, and 3rd EAI International Conference, DLI 2018, ICTCC 2018, Braga, Portugal, October 24–26, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Anthony L. Brooks & Eva Brooks & Cristina Sylla, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 58-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Artists often try to open up new experiences for people, challenging them to extend horizons and perception. This becomes particularly relevant when thinking about experiencing built environments: Here, technologies like Cave Automatic Virtual Environments (CAVE) or Head-Mounted Displays (HMD) can be used as a tool to offer richer experiences to the audience in both art installations and exhibitions. We have been developing several exhibitions tackling the challenges that come with exhibiting in (semi -) public spaces: how do we engage visitors in our exhibitions, what role do bystanders play and how can this be considered in the development and design process? The exhibitions were built in a chronological order (2015–2018) and increasing degree of immersion and interaction. For exhibition one (“step-in/Ideal Spaces”), we built a CAVE-like “tryptic” projection showing linear pre-rendered videos of seven different built environments. In exhibition two (“fly-over/Super Nubibus”) we build a replica of a hot-air-balloon and let people experience architecture from birds eye view using a HMD. Exhibition three (“cruise/Biketopia”) is also an immersive VR using a HMD, but from a very different angle. Here we use a bike to let people actively explore a space by regulating speed and direction of the bike. By using the discreet method of observation, we ensured that the visitors were not disturbed in their experience, which in turn would falsify our findings. So we are able to compare and discuss these three approaches in regards to the above mentioned criteria within this paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019. p. 58-68
Series
Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, ISSN 1867-8211 ; volume 265
Keywords [en]
Virtual reality, Spatial perception, Exhibition, (Semi-) public space, Architecture, Museum
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19038DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-06134-0_7Libris ID: mwhll1xdkkx1kxn3ISBN: 978-3-030-06134-0 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-19038DiVA, id: diva2:1286668
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2021-08-17Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, Michael

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