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Meal frequency and vegetable intake does not predict the development of frailty in older adults
University of Gothenburg.
Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3692-7014
University of Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg.
2019 (English)In: Nutrition and health, ISSN 0260-1060, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:: Frailty is considered highly prevalent among the aging population. Fruit and vegetable intake is associated with positive health outcomes across the life-span; however, the relationship with health benefits among older adults has received little attention.

AIM:: The aim was to examine if a relationship exists between meal frequency or frequency of vegetable intake and the development of frailty in a population of older adults.

METHODS:: A total of 371 individuals, 80 years or older, from the study 'Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone' were included. Data was collected in the participants' home by face-to-face interviews up to 24 months after the intervention. Baseline data were calculated using Chi2-test; statistical significance was accepted at the 5% level. Binary logistic regression was used for the relationship between meal frequency or vegetable intake and frailty.

RESULTS:: Mean meal frequency was 4.2 ± 0.9 meals per day; women seem to have a somewhat higher meal frequency than men (p=0.02); 57% of the participants had vegetables with at least one meal per day. No significant relationship was found between meal frequency or vegetable intake and frailty at 12 or 24 months follow-ups.

CONCLUSIONS:: Among this group of older adults (80+), meal frequency was slightly higher among women than men, and just over half of the participants had vegetables with at least one meal a day. The risk of developing frailty was not associated with meal frequency or vegetable intake. The questions in this study were meant as indicators for healthy food habits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 25, no 1, p. 21-28
Keywords [en]
Aged 80 and older, community dwelling, frailty, meal frequency, vegetable intake
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18878DOI: 10.1177/0260106018815224PubMedID: 30514172OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-18878DiVA, id: diva2:1270212
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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Language
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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