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Longevity and migration distance differ between wild and hand-reared mallards Anas platyrhynchos in Northern Europe
Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).ORCID-id: 0000-0003-1212-6607
Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).ORCID-id: 0000-0003-2345-3953
Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 150-166Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The mallard Anas platyrhynchos is the world’s most widespread and numerous dabbling duck. It is also farmed and released to the wild by the millions each year, but the effects of this on wild populations remain little studied. By using historical national ringing–recovery data from Sweden and Finland, we here address three predictions based on previous studies: (1) longevity is higher in wild than in hand-reared mallards, (2) wild mallards migrate longer than hand-reared, and (3) migration distance in wild ducks surviving long enough to start fall migration has decreased over the last 50 years. Indeed, wild mallards lived longer than hand-reared (19 versus 9 months in Swedish birds and 13 versus 4 months in Finnish birds). Compared to wild mallards, a smaller proportion of hand-reared birds survived long enough to have the chance to enter the wild breeding population; less than 25 % of the Swedish birds and less than 10 % of the Finnish birds lived a year or longer. Wild birds migrated farther than hand-reared (mean distance in Swedish birds, 676 versus 523 km; in Finnish birds, 1,213 versus 157 km), a pattern caused by both shorter life span and lower migration speed in hand-reared birds. Mean migration distance in wild Swedish mallards was 787 km in 1947–1972 but 591 km in 1977–1993. This difference was not statistically significant, though, possibly due to the limited sample size and lack of data from the last two decades. In general, our study provides a conservative test of the predictions addressed, calling for more research about the consequences of restocking duck populations.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2013. Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 150-166
Emneord [en]
Duck, Migration, Mortality, Restocking, Short-stopping, Survival
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-9935DOI: 10.1007/s10344-012-0660-0ISI: 000316330500004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-9935DiVA, id: diva2:578689
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-12-18 Laget: 2012-12-18 Sist oppdatert: 2019-04-09bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system
2015 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Umeå: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2015
Serie
Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae, ISSN 1652-6880 ; 2015:25
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13751 (URN)978-91-576-8248-2 (ISBN)978-91-576-8249-9 (ISBN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-03-30 Laget: 2015-03-30 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-11bibliografisk kontrollert
2. Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system
2015 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Umeå: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2015. s. 55
Emneord
Anas platyrhynchos, Farmed, Hunting, Introgression, Longevity, Mallard, Migration, Morphology, Population genetic, Restocking, SNPs, Sweden
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19214 (URN)978-91-576-8248-2 (ISBN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-04-09 Laget: 2019-04-09 Sist oppdatert: 2019-04-09bibliografisk kontrollert

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