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“Acting like a man”: emotion management in police and border guard work
Lunds universitet.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Conventional views of the police support a norm of emotion management. Aspiring police officers are taught not to show pain or fear and to display an image of control and assertion. If failing to convey such emotions officers might be considered too weak or simply not “man enough” for the job. This is also the case concerning border guarding and border police conduct. This study draws on data gathered during the study of a partly EU financed collaboration project with the purpose of decreasing and preventing trans-boundary criminality in the Baltic Sea area. The participants included police and border guard organizations from Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania and lasted for two years (2014-2015).This qualitative study is based on empirical material such as field observations and interviews with participating (male and female) police and border officers. Initially, the focusof the study was international collaboration and collaboration obstacles. The findings suggest that the officers mostly valued informal interaction (such as after-work socialising) in order togain trust in collaboration partners. An important part of this interaction consisted of police banter, joking, and of telling stories. As most of the participating officers worked inintelligence (or information exchange) they often joked about stereotypical images of “crimefighting” and of the lack of action that their work entailed. Additionally, the findings suggest that joking, bantering or teasing were strategies of handling emotionally challenging situations and of coming to terms with contrasting opinions regarding the clichéd “masculine” image of police work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keywords [en]
Social sciences, sociology, police work, intelligence, border guarding, gender, indentity, organization culture, masculinity
National Category
Sociology Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21602OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-21602DiVA, id: diva2:1523608
Conference
13th Conference of the European Sociological Association ESA: (Un)Making Europe: Capitalism, Solidarities, Subjectivities 2017/08/29 → 2017/09/01 Athens, Greece
Available from: 2021-01-28 Created: 2021-01-28 Last updated: 2021-02-08Bibliographically approved

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fulltext(1762 kB)52 downloads
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Yakhlef, Sophia
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf