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Jönsson, K. IngemarORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1732-0372
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Publications (10 of 78) Show all publications
Wendin, K., Olsson, V., Forsberg, S., Gerberich, J., Birch, K., Berg, J., . . . Jönsson, K. I. (2019). Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production. In: 13th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium: . Paper presented at 13th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production
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2019 (English)In: 13th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium, 2019Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite the many papers reporting on disgust factors of eating insects in Western cultures, the interest of insects as food is increasing, not least because they are nutritious, sustainable and tasty! The time has come to take the next step by making insects available not only as delicious restaurant food, but also for industrial production of foods and meals based on insects. The sensory attributes are of greatest importance to increase understanding of insects as a main ingredient in production and shelf life.

 

By the use of factorial designs with mealworms as main ingredient, the aim was to evaluate the sensory impact of additions such as salt, oil/water and antioxidant agent. Also the impact of particle size of the mealworms was evaluated.

Cooked fresh mealworms cut or ground into different particle sizes, oil, water, salt and rosemary were blended according to a factorial design. The resulting products were evaluated by descriptive sensory analysis in addition to instrumental measurements of viscosity and colour. Nutritional contents were calculated. 

Results showed that particle size of the mealworms had a great impact, ie an increased particle size increased the yellowness and the perceived coarseness. Further, both viscosity and crispiness increased. An increased particle size also meant a decreased odour, probably due to decreased exposure of particle surface. Increased salt content did, as expected, increase saltiness. It also increased the nutty flavour, probably due to the polarity of Sodium Chloride. Different ratios of oil/water did not seem to impact the sensory properties. With reference to the anti-oxidative effects of carnosic acid and carnosol, addition of rosemary had a significant impact on shelf life in terms of decreased rancidity and colour changes. All samples were high in protein content.

 

All factors, but especially particle size of the mealworm fraction, influenced the sensory attributes.

Keywords
Insects sensory
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19732 (URN)
Conference
13th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium
Projects
Insects as a culinary delicacy
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20170141
Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Wendin, K., Olsson, V., Forsberg, S., Gerberich, J., Birch, K., Berg, J., . . . Jönsson, K. I. (2019). Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production. In: Book of Abstracts of the EAAP 70th Annual  Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science: Animal Farming for a Healthy World. Paper presented at EAAP 70th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science. Ghent
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production
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2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts of the EAAP 70th Annual  Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science: Animal Farming for a Healthy World, Ghent, 2019, p. -161Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite the many papers reporting on disgust factors of eating insects in Western cultures, the interest of insects as food is increasing, not least because they are nutritious, sustainable and tasty! The time has come to take the next step by making insects available not only as delicious restaurant food, but also for industrial production of foods and meals based on insects. The sensory attributes are of greatest importance to increase understanding of insects as a main ingredient in production and shelf life. 

By the use of factorial designs with mealworms as main ingredient, the aim was to evaluate the sensory impact of additions such as salt, oil/water and antioxidant agent. Also the impact of particle size of the mealworms was evaluated.

Cooked fresh mealworms cut or ground into different particle sizes, oil, water, salt and rosemary were blended according to a factorial design. The resulting products were evaluated by descriptive sensory analysis in addition to instrumental measurements of viscosity and colour. Nutritional contents were calculated. 

Results showed that particle size of the mealworms had a great impact, ie an increased particle size increased the yellowness and the perceived coarseness. Further, both viscosity and crispiness increased. An increased particle size also meant a decreased odour, probably due to decreased exposure of particle surface. Increased salt content did, as expected, increase saltiness. It also increased the nutty flavour, probably due to the polarity of Sodium Chloride. Different ratios of oil/water did not seem to impact the sensory properties. With reference to the anti-oxidative effects of carnosic acid and carnosol, addition of rosemary had a significant impact on shelf life in terms of decreased rancidity and colour changes. All samples were high in protein content.

 

All factors, but especially particle size of the mealworm fraction, influenced the sensory attributes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ghent: , 2019
Series
Book of Abstracts, ISSN 1382-6077
Keywords
Inects, Tenebrio Molitor, factorial design, sensory
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19852 (URN)10390/978-90-8686-339-6 (DOI)978-90-8686-339-6 (ISBN)
Conference
EAAP 70th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science
Projects
Insects as a Culinary Delicacy
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20170141*
Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-08-27Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, K. I. (2019). Radiation tolerance in tardigrades: current knowledge and potential applications in medicine. Cancers, 11(9), Article ID 1333.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiation tolerance in tardigrades: current knowledge and potential applications in medicine
2019 (English)In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 1333Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tardigrades represent a phylum of very small aquatic animals in which many species have evolved adaptations to survive under extreme environmental conditions, such as desiccation and freezing. Studies on several species have documented that tardigrades also belong to the most radiation-tolerant animals on Earth. This paper gives an overview of our current knowledge on radiation tolerance of tardigrades, with respect to dose-responses, developmental stages, and different radiation sources. The molecular mechanisms behind radiation tolerance in tardigrades are still largely unknown, but omics studies suggest that both mechanisms related to the avoidance of DNA damage and mechanisms of DNA repair are involved. The potential of tardigrades to provide knowledge of importance for medical sciences has long been recognized, but it is not until recently that more apparent evidence of such potential has appeared. Recent studies show that stress-related tardigrade genes may be transfected to human cells and provide increased tolerance to osmotic stress and ionizing radiation. With the recent sequencing of the tardigrade genome, more studies applying tardigrade omics to relevant aspects of human medicine are expected. In particular, the cancer research field has potential to learn from studies on tardigrades about molecular mechanisms evolved to maintain genome integrity.

Keywords
anhydrobiosis, cancer, cryptobiosis, desiccation tolerance, DNA repair, oxidative stress, radiation tolerance, tardigrades
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19955 (URN)10.3390/cancers11091333 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Beery, T., Raymond, C. M., Kyttä, M., Olafsson, A. S., Plieninger, T., Sandberg, M., . . . Jönsson, K. I. (2017). Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning. Ambio, 46(7), 717-730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning
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2017 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 717-730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concern for a diminished human experience of nature and subsequent decreased human well-being is addressed via a consideration of green infrastructure's potential to facilitate unplanned or incidental nature experience. Incidental nature experience is conceptualized and illustrated in order to consider this seldom addressed aspect of human interaction with nature in green infrastructure planning. Special attention has been paid to the ability of incidental nature experience to redirect attention from a primary activity toward an unplanned focus (in this case, nature phenomena). The value of such experience for human well-being is considered. The role of green infrastructure to provide the opportunity for incidental nature experience may serve as a nudge or guide toward meaningful interaction. These ideas are explored using examples of green infrastructure design in two Nordic municipalities: Kristianstad, Sweden, and Copenhagen, Denmark. The outcome of the case study analysis coupled with the review of literature is a set of sample recommendations for how green infrastructure can be designed to support a range of incidental nature experiences with the potential to support human well-being.

Keywords
Extinction of experience, Human well-being, Incidental nature experience, Intentional nature experience, Nudging, Redirection of attention
National Category
Natural Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16692 (URN)10.1007/s13280-017-0920-z (DOI)000411967700001 ()28444643 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-11-15Bibliographically approved
Beery, T. H. & Jönsson, K. I. (2017). Outdoor recreation and place attachment: exploring the potential of outdoor recreation within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, 17, 54-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor recreation and place attachment: exploring the potential of outdoor recreation within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve
2017 (English)In: Journal of Outdoor Recreation, ISSN 2213-0780, E-ISSN 2213-0799, Vol. 17, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates outdoor recreation participation within a multifunctional landscape, a UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve. The reserve, the Kristianstad Vattenrike located in southern Sweden, has made a deliberate effort to make the experience of biodiversity possible for residents and visitors. Recreation is a keypart of the biodiversity conservation effort in the area, represented by the infrastructure of the Kristianstad Vattenrike's 21 visitor sites. Given the biosphere reserve context, this study investigates the question of whether there is a relationship between outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Survey data was collected using concurrent application of multiple sampling strategies including both probability and purposive sampling of local adult residents of the biosphere area. Quantitative analysis showed a significant positive relationship between the level of outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Qualitative data supported this relationship with more details about place attachment within the studied area. The study confirms a relationship between place attachment and outdoor recreation and provides insight into how the biosphere reserve context supports this relationship. The results of this study show that significant biodiversity management in close conjunction with outdoor recreational opportunity can be achieved and provides opportunities for human engagement and experience of biodiversity.

Management Implications: This research can help managers design recreational settings that support biodiversity conservation goals. Our research found that:

• A leading motivation for outdoor recreation participation is nature experience and this motivation can be used by managers to highlight a biodiversity conservation interpretive message in the design of outdoor recreation infrastructure.

• Providing proximate access to nature based outdoor recreation, to support deliberate and direct experience of biodiversity, is an important component of engaging the public in biodiversity conservation.

• Recreation proximity alone will not create public engagement in biodiversity conservation. However,proximity as a part of a deliberate institutional design including biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and logistic support for research and monitoring may be critical for public engagement.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Kristianstad Vattenrike, outdoor education, place attachment, biosphere reserves
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16522 (URN)10.1016/j.jort.2017.01.002 (DOI)000400277500007 ()
Available from: 2017-02-04 Created: 2017-02-04 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Czernekova, M., Jönsson, K. I., Chajec, L., Student, S. & Poprawa, I. (2017). The structure of the desiccated Richtersius coronifer (Richters, 1903). Protoplasma, 254(3), 1367-1377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The structure of the desiccated Richtersius coronifer (Richters, 1903)
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2017 (English)In: Protoplasma, ISSN 0033-183X, E-ISSN 1615-6102, Vol. 254, no 3, p. 1367-1377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tun formation is an essential morphological adaptation for entering the anhydrobiotic state in tardigrades, but its internal structure has rarely been investigated. We present the structure and ultrastructure of organs and cells in desiccated Richtersius coronifer by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and histochemical methods. A 3D reconstruction of the body organization of the tun stage is also presented. The tun formation during anhydrobiosis of tardigrades is a process of anterior-posterior body contraction, which relocates some organs such as the pharyngeal bulb. The cuticle is composed of epicuticle, intracuticle and procuticle; flocculent coat; and trilaminate layer. Moulting does not seem to restrict the tun formation, as evidenced from tardigrade tuns that were in the process of moulting. The storage cells of desiccated specimens filled up the free inner space and surrounded internal organs, such as the ovary and digestive system, which were contracted. All cells (epidermal cells, storage cells, ovary cells, cells of the digestive system) underwent shrinkage, and their cytoplasm was electron dense. Lipids and polysaccharides dominated among reserve material of storage cells, while the amount of protein was small. The basic morphology of specific cell types and organelles did not differ between active and anhydrobiotic R. coronifer.

Keywords
Anhydrobiosis; Cryptobiosis; Tardigrades; Tun; Ultrastructure
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16105 (URN)10.1007/s00709-016-1027-2 (DOI)000399037400020 ()27677802 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-06-19Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, K. I. & Wojcik, A. (2017). Tolerance to X-rays and Heavy Ions (Fe, He) in the Tardigrade Richtersius coronifer and the Bdelloid Rotifer Mniobia russeola. Astrobiology, 17(2), 163-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tolerance to X-rays and Heavy Ions (Fe, He) in the Tardigrade Richtersius coronifer and the Bdelloid Rotifer Mniobia russeola
2017 (English)In: Astrobiology, ISSN 1531-1074, E-ISSN 1557-8070, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyze tolerance to heavy ions in desiccated animals of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer and the bdelloid rotifer Mniobia russeola within the STARLIFE project. Both species were exposed to iron (Fe) and helium (He) ions at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan, and to X-rays at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany. Results show no effect of Fe and He on viability up to 7 days post-rehydration in both R. coronifer and M. russeola, while X-rays tended to reduce viability in R. coronifer at the highest doses. Mean egg production rate tended to decline with higher doses in R. coronifer for all radiation types, but the pattern was not statistically confirmed. In M. russeola, there was no such tendency for a dose response in egg production rate. These results confirm the previously reported high tolerance to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in tardigrades and show for the first time that bdelloid rotifers are also very tolerant to high-LET radiation. These animal phyla represent the most desiccation- and radiation-tolerant animals on Earth and provide excellent eukaryotic models for astrobiological research. 

Keywords
Tardigrades, radiation tolerance, Richtersius coronifer, mniobia russeola, high-LET
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16546 (URN)10.1089/ast.2015.1462 (DOI)000394372800008 ()28206820 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 87/11
Available from: 2017-02-18 Created: 2017-02-18 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Czernekova, M. & Jönsson, K. I. (2016). Experimentally induced repeated anhydrobiosis in the Eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. PLoS ONE, 11(11), Article ID e0164062.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimentally induced repeated anhydrobiosis in the Eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer
2016 (Swedish)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0164062Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tardigrades represent one of the main animal groups with anhydrobiotic capacity at any stage of their life cycle. The ability of tardigrades to survive repeated cycles of anhydrobiosis has rarely been studied but is of interest to understand the factors constraining anhydrobiotic survival. The main objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of survival of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer under repeated cycles of desiccation, and the potential effect of repeated desiccation on size, shape and number of storage cells. We also analyzed potential change in body size, gut content and frequency of mitotic storage cells. Specimens were kept under non-cultured conditions and desiccated under controlled relative humidity. After each desiccation cycle 10 specimens were selected for analysis of morphometric characteristics and mitosis. The study demonstrates that tardigrades may survive up to 6 repeated desiccations, with declining survival rates with increased numberof desiccations. We found a significantly higher proportion of animals that were unable to contract properly into a tun stage during the desiccation process at the 5th and 6th desiccations. Also total number of storage cells declined at the 5th and 6th desiccations, while no effect on storage cell size was observed. The frequency of mitotic storage cells tended to decline with higher number of desiccation cycles. Our study shows that the number of consecutive cycles of anhydrobiosis that R. coronifer may undergo is limited, with increased inability for tun formation and energetic constraints as possible causal factors.

Keywords
Tardigrades, desiccation tolerance, Richtersius coronifer
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16233 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0164062 (DOI)000387724300013 ()27828978 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-11-15 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Vecchi, M., Cesari, M., Bertolani, R., Jönsson, I., Rebecchi, L. & Guidetti, R. (2016). Integrative systematic studies on tardigrades from Antarctica identify new genera and new species within Macrobiotoidea and Echiniscoidea. Invertebrate systematics, 30(4), 303-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrative systematic studies on tardigrades from Antarctica identify new genera and new species within Macrobiotoidea and Echiniscoidea
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2016 (English)In: Invertebrate systematics, ISSN 1445-5226, E-ISSN 1447-2600, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 303-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tardigrades represent one of the most abundant groups of Antarctic metazoans in terms of abundance and diversity, thanks to their ability to withstand desiccation and freezing; however, their biodiversity is underestimated. Antarctic tardigrades from Dronning Maud Land and Victoria Land were analysed from a morphological point of view with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and from a molecular point of view using two genes (18S, 28S) analysed in Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood frameworks. In addition, indel-coding datasets were used for the first time to infer tardigrade phylogenies. We also compared Antarctic specimens with those from Italy and Greenland. A combined morphological and molecular analysis led to the identification of two new evolutionary lineages, for which we here erect the new genera Acanthechiniscus, gen. nov. (Echiniscidae, Echiniscoidea) and Mesobiotus, gen. nov. (Macrobiotidae, Macrobiotoidea). Moreover, two species new to science were discovered: Pseudechiniscus titianae,sp. nov. (Echiniscidae : Echiniscoidea) and Mesobiotus hilariae, sp. nov. (Macrobiotidae : Macrobiotoidea). This study highlights the high tardigrade diversity in Antarctica and the importance of an integrated approach in faunal and taxonomic studies.

Keywords
Molecular phylogenetics, nuclear DNA, systematics, Tardigrada, taxonomy, Björndjur, tardigrada, Antarktis
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15942 (URN)10.1071/IS15033 (DOI)000383540800001 ()
Funder
Swedish Polar Research Secretariat
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-09-06 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved
Czernekova, M. & Jönsson, K. I. (2016). Mitosis in storage cells of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 178(4), 888-896
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mitosis in storage cells of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer
2016 (English)In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 178, no 4, p. 888-896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although tardigrades are sometimes reported as eutelic animals, mitosis has been reported in several somatic tissues of adult eutardigrades. The occurrence of cell division in storage cells is particularly interesting in light of the important role that these cells play in the physiology of tardigrades. We present data on the occurrence of mitosis in storage cells of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer (Richters, 1903), and analyse mitotic cells in relation to different body characteristics, including egg development stage, moulting, gut content, body length, number and size of oocytes, and shape and size of the storage cells. Mitosis was present in ~20% of all animals, and was more frequent in juveniles than in adults. The proportion of cells with mitosis (‘mitotic index’) was low: 0.76% in juveniles and 1.47% in adults. In juveniles, none of the measured phenotypic characters had significant predictive power for mitosis, whereas in adult animals in moult or in late egg developmental or post-laying stage were more likely to have mitotic storage cells. The association with the later part of the moulting process was particularly strong. The low mitotic index and the strong association with moulting suggests that mitosis in storage cells may be connected with somatic growth rather than cell renewal, and that the purpose of cell division may relate to a need of more cells to support the enlarged body after moulting. However, the specific life cycle of tardigrades, where energy intake and depletion, egg development, and moulting is highly intertwined and synchronized, make conclusions about the functional role of mitosis in storage cells difficult, however, and more studies are needed to reveal the mechanisms inducing mitosis in these interesting cells.

Keywords
Tardigrades, mitosis, storage cells
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16275 (URN)10.1111/zoj.12440 (DOI)000388622800019 ()
Available from: 2016-11-29 Created: 2016-11-29 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1732-0372

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