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Wallin Bengtsson, Viveca
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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Wallin Bengtsson, V., Persson, R. G., Berglund, J. & Renvert, S. (2019). Carotid calcifications in panoramic radiographs are associated with future stroke or ischemic heart diseases: a long-term follow-up study. Clinical Oral Investigations, 23(3), 1171-1179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carotid calcifications in panoramic radiographs are associated with future stroke or ischemic heart diseases: a long-term follow-up study
2019 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 1171-1179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To assess if carotid calcifications detected in panoramic radiographs are associated with future events of stroke, and/or ischemic heart diseases over 10-13 years in individuals between 60 and 96 years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline (2001-2004) panoramic radiographs were assessed for evidence of carotid calcifications from individuals with no previous history of stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases. A radiopaque nodular mass adjacent to the cervical vertebrae, at or below the intervertebral space C3-C4, was interpreted as carotid calcification. Annual medical records were searched for ICD 10 codes through 2014.

RESULTS: Signs of carotid calcification was demonstrated in 238/635 (37.5%) of the study individuals. Signs of carotid calcification was associated with future stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases (χ2 = 9.1, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.2, p < 0.002). In individuals 60-72 years, a significant association between radiographic signs of carotid calcification and stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases (χ2 = 12.4, OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 4.0, p < 0.000) (adjusted for high blood pressure, diabetes type 2, BMI; OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.5, p = 0.03). Individuals (60-72 years) with radiographic evidence of carotid calcifications had a mean cumulative stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases survival time of 12.1 years compared to those without such evidence (13.0 years) (log rank Mantel-Cox χ2 = 10.7, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of carotid calcifications in panoramic radiographs is associated with an event of stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases in 60-96-year-old individuals.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Radiographic evidence of carotid calcifications is associated with stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases. Patients with signs of carotid calcifications should therefore be referred for medical examination.

Keywords
Carotid calcification, Ischemic heart diseases, Panoramic radiographs, Stroke
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19476 (URN)10.1007/s00784-018-2533-8 (DOI)29967974 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Holmer, H., Widén, C., Wallin Bengtsson, V., Coleman, M., Wohlfart, B., Steen, S., . . . Sjöberg, K. (2018). Improved general and oral health in diabetic patients by an Okinawan-based Nordic diet: a pilot study. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(7), Article ID E1949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved general and oral health in diabetic patients by an Okinawan-based Nordic diet: a pilot study
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 7, article id E1949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Periodontal disease, periodontitis as well as the preceding gingivitis, has been associated with both obesity and diabetes. Studies have shown that diet changes can lead to a lower incidence of such inflammation. The aim of the present case series over four weeks was to study the effects on medical and dental conditions in patients with type 2 diabetes of the consumption of the Okinawan-based Nordic Diet (OBND&reg;). Medical and dental examinations were performed to estimate the general health and gingivitis/periodontitis. Serum cytokine levels were assessed using Luminex technology. Eight of ten study participants completed the study. All participants lost weight (p = 0.012). Six out of seven that were treated with insulin could reduce their insulin intake after two weeks with OBND&reg;. The reduction was about 16 units which corresponds to a 34% relative reduction compared to the starting point (range 15⁻63%). Fasting blood glucose values fell (p = 0.035). Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (p = 0.01), triglycerides (p = 0.05), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (p = 0.05) were also reduced. Bleeding on probing changed from ~28% before any dietary changes to ~13% after two weeks with OBND&reg; (p = 0.01). The reduction in gingival bleeding was as substantial as might be expected from one session of professional tooth cleaning. Markers of inflammation were also reduced. The OBND&reg; thus showed significant promise in alleviating the impact of diabetes on dental as well as general health.

Keywords
bleeding on probing, clinical study, cytokines, diet, metabolic disorder, oral health
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18369 (URN)10.3390/ijms19071949 (DOI)000442807400128 ()29970834 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Wallin Bengtsson, V., Persson, G. R., Berglund, J. & Renvert, S. (2015). A cross-sectional study of the associations between periodontitis and carotid arterial calcifications in an elderly population. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 74(2), 115-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-sectional study of the associations between periodontitis and carotid arterial calcifications in an elderly population
2015 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if the presence of periodontitis is associated with carotid arterial calcifications diagnosed on panoramic radiographs in an elderly population.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Study individuals were randomly selected from the Swedish civil registration database representing the aging population (60-96 years) in Karlskrona, Sweden. Bleeding on probing (BOP) and the deepest probing measurement at each tooth were registered. The proportions of teeth with a probing depth ≥5 mm and the proportion of teeth with bleeding on probing were calculated. Analog panoramic radiographs were taken and the proportion of sites with a distance ≥5 mm between the alveolar bone level and the cement-enamel junction (CEJ) were assessed. A diagnosis of periodontitis was declared if a distance between the alveolar bone level and the CEJ ≥5 mm could be identified from the panoramic radiographs at >10% of sites, probing depth of ≥5 mm at one tooth or more and with BOP at >20% of teeth.

RESULTS: Readable radiographs were obtained from 499 individuals. Carotid calcification was identified in 39.1%. Individuals were diagnosed with periodontitis in 18.4%. Data analysis demonstrated that individuals with periodontitis had a higher prevalence of carotid calcifications (Pearson χ (2) = 4.05 p < 0.05) and with a likelihood of 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0, 2.3, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Data analysis demonstrated a significant association between periodontitis and carotid calcification.

Keywords
Carotid arterial calcifications, panoramic radiographs, periodontitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14053 (URN)10.3109/00016357.2015.1050603 (DOI)000366811600006 ()26066062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-17 Created: 2015-06-17 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Renvert, S., Wallin-Bengtsson, V., Berglund, J. & Persson, G. R. (2015). Periodontitis in older Swedish individuals fails to predict mortality. Clinical Oral Investigations, 19(2), 193-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periodontitis in older Swedish individuals fails to predict mortality
2015 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess mortality risk and its association to health aspects in dentate individuals 60 years of age and older.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical and periodontal data from 870 dentate individuals (age range 60-96) participating in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Blekinge (SNAC-Blekinge) with survival statistics over 6 years were studied.

RESULTS: During 6 years of follow-up, 42/474 of the individuals (8.9 %), who at baseline were between age 60 and 75, and 134/396 individuals of the individuals (33.9 %), who at baseline were ≥75 years, died. Surviving dentate individuals had more teeth (mean 19.3, S.D. ± 7.9) than those who died (mean 15.9, S.D. ± 7.3; mean diff 3,3; S.E. mean diff 0.7; 95 % CI 2.0, 4.6; p = 0.001). A self-reported history of high blood pressure (F = 15.0, p < 0.001), heart failure (F = 24.5, p < 0.001, observed power = 0.99), older age (F = 34.7, p < 0.001), male gender (F = 6.3, p < 0.01), serum HbA1c with 6.5 % as cutoff level (F = 9.3, p = 0.002) were factors associated with mortality. A medical diagnosis of heart disease, diabetes, any form of cancer, or periodontitis failed to predict mortality.

CONCLUSIONS: A self-reported history of angina pectoris, chronic heart failure, elevated serum HbA1c, and few remaining teeth were associated with mortality risk. A professional diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, or periodontitis was not predictive of mortality.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Self-health reports are important to observe in the assessment of disease and survival in older individual.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12070 (URN)10.1007/s00784-014-1214-5 (DOI)000350353300004 ()24659087 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-26 Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Wallin Bengtsson, V., Persson, G. R. & Renvert, S. (2014). Assessment of carotid calcifications on panoramic radiographs in relation to other used methods and relationship to periodontitis and stroke: a literature review. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 72(6), 401-412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of carotid calcifications on panoramic radiographs in relation to other used methods and relationship to periodontitis and stroke: a literature review
2014 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 401-412Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. To assess the literature on carotid calcifications defined from panoramic radiographs (PMX) and concurrent diagnosis of stroke and periodontitis.

Materials and methods. A literature search screening for publications using search terms such as PMX and carotid calcification, stroke and periodontitis was performed in November 2012.

Results. A total of 189 articles were retrieved, among which 30 were included in the review. The sensitivity for PMX findings of carotid calcifications (CC) compared to a diagnosis by Doppler sonography varied between 31.1–100%. The specificity for PMX findings of carotid calcifications compared to a diagnosis by Doppler sonography varied between 21.4–87.5%. Individuals with CC findings from PMX have more periodontitis and risk for stroke.

Conclusions. There is a shortage of well-designed studies in older dentate individuals assessing the associations between periodontitis and radiographic evidence of CC and in relation to stroke or other cardiovascular diseases.

Statement of Clinical Relevance. Carotid calcifications are prevalent in patients with periodontitis and such individuals may have an increased risk for stroke. The absence of signs of carotid calcification on panoramic radiographs is indicative of no calcification of carotid arteries.

Keywords
panoramic radiograph, carotid calcification, periodontitis, review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11659 (URN)10.3109/00016357.2013.847489 (DOI)000340259700001 ()24432815 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
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