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Einarson, D. & Klonowska, K. (2021). Education for the remote work methods of the future in software engineering. In: : . Paper presented at The Future of Education - 11th Edition 1-2 July 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education for the remote work methods of the future in software engineering
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This contribution studies the new forms of work that arise as a consequence of the pandemic, and presents how students in education can be prepared for these forms of work. More and more discussions concern adjustments to remote work. This also applies to the academy, which then has a responsibility, not only to change work towards distance forms, but also train students in these for their future professional career. A survey was conducted during the autumn semester of 2020 when a course in Software Engineering, which normally is dependent on physical meetings, was forced to be given completely online. The outcome was documented by the teachers during the course through continuous discussions and investigations, and was later compiled into a conference contribution, which is currently in a peer-review process [1]. Among the discussions it was mentioned that we may experience a ‘game-changer’, and more precisely that in the future we may work globally and distributed, i.e., independently of a localized office. Globally, it is possible to see discussions regarding such a 'game-changer'. At the World Economic Forum's Davos Agenda 25-29 January, 2021, the possible future labor market was discussed via the article [2]. This as a reflection on the situation that has arisen that the pandemic has contributed to, and future possible consequences of this. Similar discussions on the expansion of remote work, are covered, e.g., in [3] and [4], which in turn demands for new responsibilities at academia, with respect to adjustments in courses to meet challenges of future remote work. The contribution presents changes in teaching so that this corresponds well with a shift in the IT-industry towards remote working. New teaching elements are implemented in larger project courses, where the focus is on online-based development with modern tools for testing and integration. Process models that were previously seen as flexible and efficient, but have been dependent on physical meetings, are adjusted to be able to be performed distributed and remote. Studies of corresponding changes in the regional IT-industry are reported, as well as psycho-social consequences of the new forms of working.

Keywords
Software Engineering, Distributed Development, Future Remote Work Methods, Agile Online
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21986 (URN)
Conference
The Future of Education - 11th Edition 1-2 July 2021
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2021-06-14Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D. & Teljega, M. (2021). Effects of migrating large-scaled project groups to online development teams. In: The 17th CDIO International Conference: . Paper presented at The 17th CDIO International Conference, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, Online, June 21-23 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of migrating large-scaled project groups to online development teams
2021 (English)In: The 17th CDIO International Conference, 2021Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21995 (URN)
Conference
The 17th CDIO International Conference, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, Online, June 21-23 2021
Available from: 2021-06-15 Created: 2021-06-15 Last updated: 2021-06-21Bibliographically approved
Klonowska, K., Frisk, F. & Einarson, D. (2021). The win-win of synchronizing last semester’s Computer Engineering courses. In: : . Paper presented at 17th International CDIO Conference - Bangkok, Thailand - Online - June 21-23 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The win-win of synchronizing last semester’s Computer Engineering courses
2021 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This contribution addresses how two parallel courses during the last semester, where one is a final course for degree projects, have been synchronized. This is to give students a greater chance to complete the courses on time, and at the same time create a greater understanding of complicated problems.

The three-year Computer Engineering program at Kristianstad University, Sweden, has for several years suffered from difficulties during the third semester of the third year, where students most often tend to miss significant deadlines. This semester, which is the students' last, comprises a final degree project of 15 credits, which corresponds to half the work effort during the semester. Different approaches have been tested to give students the best possible conditions to complete the degree project on time. On the one hand, the degree project has been full-time during the latter part of the semester, with the first half consisting of other courses. On the other hand, the degree project has run in parallel with other courses throughout the semester. However, both approaches have resulted in situations where the students in many cases do not complete the degree project, and that other courses during the semester have also suffered.

A revision of the Computer Engineering program was made three years ago. The difficulties with the last semester have then also been considered. An effort has been made to develop synchronization opportunities between the courses during this semester. A new course, Systems Engineering, of 15 credits throughout the semester, has been developed, where the content of the course, as well as levels of learning objectives and examination forms have been considered to suit the parallel ongoing course for the degree project. Students have been offered opportunities to develop and analyze advanced systems where the course System Engineering has been based on the implementation of technical constructions, while the course for degree projects has been based on more theoretical and exploratory perspectives.

The students design the systems with both hardware and software. At the same time as they conduct literature studies, and investigate suitable analysis methods. Examples of systems include:

- Drones. Processors for these, as well as software to give these flying properties, are developed. Technical measurements are made, for analysis and evaluations. Measurements made are based, e.g., on the placement of sensors, and performance on technical protocols.

- Body Sensor Networks. Here, too, both hardware and software are designed to put the system into operation, and technical measurements are made to study at the usability of the system.

Synchronizing the courses has generally given good results, where the opportunity to complete the courses has increased drastically. A survey of the students' experiences has been made, and this has shown high satisfaction.

The program is clearly CDIO-oriented, which is also expressed in the education plan. The perception is that the synchronization of courses described in this contribution, and the effects of this, further increase the fundamental values ​​pointed out by the CDIO.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21996 (URN)
Conference
17th International CDIO Conference - Bangkok, Thailand - Online - June 21-23 2021
Available from: 2021-06-15 Created: 2021-06-15 Last updated: 2021-06-21Bibliographically approved
Melén, M., Persson, C. & Einarson, D. (2020). Educate the educators in teaching and learning for sustainable development. Paper presented at International Consortium for Education Development (ICED), Zurich, June 15-19, 2020. ETH Learning and teaching journal, 2(2), 338-341
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educate the educators in teaching and learning for sustainable development
2020 (English)In: ETH Learning and teaching journal, ISSN 2624-7992, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 338-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper will discuss the future-ready university at the level of its future-ready teachers with regard to their teaching and learning practice for sustainable development. Academic institutions have both a role in promoting discussions of concern based on their specialized disciplines and a role in educating students to be future-ready to contribute to the society in a sustainable way. However, carrying out such roles with sufficient credibility may not be a matter of course for university teachers, who need sufficient insights into both sustainability per se and sustainable pedagogical teaching practice. This paper stresses the importance to the development of the future-ready university of cultivating sustainability, and provides an “educate the educators” project as an example.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Zurich: , 2020
Keywords
future, future-ready, university, higher education, university teachers, sustainability, sustainable pedagogical teaching practice, education, educating the educators
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21096 (URN)
Conference
International Consortium for Education Development (ICED), Zurich, June 15-19, 2020
Available from: 2020-08-28 Created: 2020-08-28 Last updated: 2021-05-25Bibliographically approved
Argento, D., Einarson, D., Mårtensson, L., Persson, C., Wendin, K. & Westergren, A. (2020). Integrating sustainability in higher education: a Swedish case. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 21(6), 1131-1150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating sustainability in higher education: a Swedish case
Show others...
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1131-1150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This paper aims to unveil how sustainability is integrated into the courses/programmes ofhigher education institutions. The research question addressed is: how do academics representing differentdisciplines cooperate and engage in the work of integrating sustainability into their teaching programmes.Design/methodology/approach – This paper draws upon the notions of practise variation andinstitutional work from institutional theory and empirically focusses on the case of Kristianstad University(Sweden). This case is based on an autoethnographic approach and illustrates the experiences shared by sixcolleagues, representing different disciplines, engaged in implementing sustainability in their courses/programmes.Findings – The findings highlight how academics representing different disciplines, with specific traditionsand characteristics, face the sustainability challenge. Despite being bound by similar sustainable developmentgoals, differences across disciplines need to be acknowledged and used as an asset if trans-disciplinarity is theultimate goal.Research limitations/implications – Although the intrinsic motivation of individuals to work withsustainability might be a strong driver, the implementation of sustainability within courses/programmes andacross disciplines requires joint efforts and collective institutional work.Practical implications – By highlighting how academics engage in the work of integratingsustainability, this study emphasizes that managers of higher education institutions need to account for thetime and additional resources needed to ensure that academics effectively cope with sustainability. Intrinsicmotivation may not last if organizational structures and leadership are not supportive on a practical level andin the long run.

Keywords
Higher education, Sustainability, Sustainable development goals, Institutional work, Inter-disciplinarity, Trans-disciplinarity
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-20951 (URN)10.1108/IJSHE-10-2019-0292 (DOI)000556904000001 ()
Available from: 2020-08-10 Created: 2020-08-10 Last updated: 2021-03-11Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D. & Teljega, M. (2020). Smart home techniques for young people with functional disabilities. In: ACHI 2020: the thirteenth international conference on advances in computer-human interactions. Paper presented at ACHI 2020 Valencia, Spain (pp. 294-300).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smart home techniques for young people with functional disabilities
2020 (English)In: ACHI 2020: the thirteenth international conference on advances in computer-human interactions, 2020, p. 294-300Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A purpose behind the United Nation’s Agenda 2030is that no one shall be left behind, which implies that supportfor vulnerable people shall be seen as clearly significant. Inthat context, assistive technologies serve purposes of improvingdisabled individuals’ inclusiveness and overall well-being. Thiscontribution covers ongoing experiments on techniquesdeveloped for Smart Homes, where the outcomes of suchdevelopments are targeted towards young people withfunctional disabilities, in order to provide them withindependence in their own living space.

Keywords
Smart Homes; IT-based support systems; Sustainable Development; Quality of Life; Assistive technologies.
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-21094 (URN)978-1-61208-761-0 (ISBN)
Conference
ACHI 2020 Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2020-08-28 Created: 2020-08-28 Last updated: 2020-11-23Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D. & Wiklund, P. (2018). Digitala stöd för mental hälsa.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitala stöd för mental hälsa
2018 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Series
Telias nyhetsbrev
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19380 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D. & Saplacan, D. (2017). Addressing integrated learning through project-based courses: five years of improvements. In: Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22 2017: . Paper presented at 13th International CDIO Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing integrated learning through project-based courses: five years of improvements
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22 2017, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Project-based educational forms are at the core of the CDIO concept, where students should be trained in contexts of complex enough tasks to prepare for the complexity of industry projects. Besides from fulfilling a project in itself, CDIO points out the importance of achieving integrated learning skills, including personal and interpersonal skills (CDIO Syllabus sections 2 and 3), where those are desired to meet the challenges of the working processes.

Projects in education moreover correspond to active learning, where students are encouraged to learn through solving the problems required to fulfill the goals of a project. Being active in the process of completing a project, does not only imply disciplinary training, but also training in achieving generic skills, such as experimentation, knowledge discovery, system thinking, teamwork, and communication. All in all, a conclusion is that student activities in project-based teaching and learning relate to all four sections of the CDIO Syllabus, and hence active learning will here contribute to integrated learning. Thus, activating students in project-based courses should have several positive values.

However, experiences show that one problem in project-based courses is that of activating a major part of a student group. Here, a common pattern is that some students are not contributing enough, resulting in other students covering up for them, or risking the whole project. Therefore, teaching efforts should be put on finding ways to widen the group of active students.

The project-based course Software Engineering 2, at Kristianstad University, Sweden, has undergone several years of improvements in order to, on one hand reduce the number of passive students, and on the other hand increase values of generic skills from the CDIO Syllabus. This paper will present development steps of that course. Methods, where some have been inspired from the Software Engineering industry, will be covered, and results of using those will be provided. A major result is that of increasing values of integrated learning, where this in itself contributes to the core of CDIO.

Keywords
Project-based course, integrated learning experiences, CDIO learning outcomes, ethical aspects, capability-maturity model (CMM), self-awareness, Standards: 5, 7, 8
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19379 (URN)
Conference
13th International CDIO Conference
Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D. & Saplacan, D. (2016). A proposal of learning outcomes for work integrated learning based on 2d-evaluation methods. In: Claes Dahlqvist & Stefan Larsson (Ed.), Claes Dahlqvist & Stefan Larsson (Ed.), Lärarlärdom 2016: Högskolan Kristianstad. Paper presented at Lärarlärdom, Högskolan Kristianstad, 17 augusti, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A proposal of learning outcomes for work integrated learning based on 2d-evaluation methods
2016 (English)In: Lärarlärdom 2016: Högskolan Kristianstad / [ed] Claes Dahlqvist & Stefan Larsson, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The core of CDIO addresses criticism from engineering industry according engineering education having too much focus on theoretical training. Here, practice, and especially integrating theory and practice, has had a peripheral role implying students not being well enough prepared for the complexity of industry’s real world problems and solutions. CDIO aims to meet that criticism through especially illuminating on project based educational forms, where sections of the, so called, CDIO Syllabus point out desired knowledge and skills that are needed to fulfil complex enough projects in engineering education. That approach not only prepares students in appropriate ways for the benefits of industry, but also increases their value of being employable. CDIO does not explicitly point out industry close work placement in education, neither in the CDIO syllabus, nor in the CDIO Standards. Still, many universities strive after work integrated learning, in purposes of, e.g., employability, and real world preparation. Experiences show problems in work integrated learning due to several reasons, such as, establishing sustainable academy–industry contacts, strategies for project ownership and IPR (Intellectual Property Rights), and guarantees according fulfillment of academic requirements on learning outcomes.

The concept of Demola relates to a platform for collaborations between academy and industry with focus on multi-disciplinary student projects. Especially focus is on innovation, where industry may experiment with new ideas at low cost. Demola has proved itself to be a successful approach, with developed templates for student-industry contracts, and process models. Still, to be an attractive choice for work integrated learning, the Demola approach also has to be clear with respect to academic contexts of courses’ learning outcomes, and course evaluations.

The aim of this contribution is to point out a set of learning outcomes in a purpose of clarifying on such set being an inherent part of Demola. That set, which is based on CDIO Syllabus, shall map towards a tool for evaluations, where the two-dimensional multi-valued tool ZEFsurvey, is chosen. Overviews and discussions will be provided, as well as test cases, and comparisons between the chosen set with the Swedish national framework for education, will be outlined in the purpose of pointing out adaptability in an international context.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16582 (URN)
Conference
Lärarlärdom, Högskolan Kristianstad, 17 augusti, 2016
Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2017-03-07Bibliographically approved
Einarson, D., Saplacan, D. & Silvén, P. (2016). Approaching work integrated learning through learning outcomes and evaluations. In: Jerker Björkqvist, Kristina Edström, Ronald J. Hugo, Juha Kontio, Janne Roslöf, Rick Sellens & Seppo Virtanen (Ed.), The 12th international CDIO conference proceedings: full papers. Paper presented at The 12th International CDIO Conference (pp. 722-732). Turku: Turku University of Applied Sciences, Article ID 144.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Approaching work integrated learning through learning outcomes and evaluations
2016 (English)In: The 12th international CDIO conference proceedings: full papers / [ed] Jerker Björkqvist, Kristina Edström, Ronald J. Hugo, Juha Kontio, Janne Roslöf, Rick Sellens & Seppo Virtanen, Turku: Turku University of Applied Sciences , 2016, p. 722-732, article id 144Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The  core  of  CDIO  addresses  criticism  from  engineering  industry  according engineering education having too much focus on theoretical training. Here, practice, and especially integrating theory and practice, has had a peripheral role implying students not being well enough prepared for the complexity of industry’s real world problems and solutions. CDIO aims to meet that criticism through especially illuminating on project based educational forms, where sections of the, so called, CDIO Syllabus point out desired knowledge and skills that are needed to fulfil complex enough projects in engineering education. That approach not only prepares students in appropriate ways for the benefits of industry, but also increases their value of being employable. CDIO does not explicitly point out industry close work placement in education, neither in the CDIO syllabus, nor in the CDIO Standards. Still, many universities strive after work integrated learning, in purposes of, e.g., employability, and real world preparation. Experiences show problems in work integrated learning due to several reasons, such as, establishing sustainable academy–industry contacts, strategies for project ownership and IPR (Intellectual Property Rights), and guarantees according fulfillment of academic requirements on learning outcomes.

The concept of Demola relates to a platform for collaborations between academy and industry with focus on multi-disciplinary student projects. Especially, focus is on innovation, where industry may experiment with new ideas at low cost. Demola has proved itself to be a successful approach, with developed templates for student-industry contracts, and process models. Still, to be an attractive choice for work integrated learning, the Demola approach also has to be clear with respect to academic contexts of courses’ learning outcomes, and course evaluations.

The aim of this contribution is to point out a set of learning outcomes in a purpose of clarifying on such set being an inherent part of Demola. That set, which is based on CDIO Syllabus, shall map towards a tool for evaluations, where the two-dimensional multi-valued tool ZEFsurvey, is chosen. Overviews, case studies, and discussions will be provided, where one purpose is to point out the adaptability of Demola in an international context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku: Turku University of Applied Sciences, 2016
Series
CDIO Initiative. Proceedings of the International CDIO Conference, ISSN 2002-1593
Keywords
University-Industry cooperation, project based work, work integrated learning, CDIO learning outcomes, course evaluation, Standards: 1, 2, 7, 8
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16922 (URN)978-952-216-610-4 (ISBN)
Conference
The 12th International CDIO Conference
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6519-5051

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