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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Ahlin, L. (2019). ’White noir’ in Sàpmi: Lars Pettersson’s novels. In: : . Paper presented at Captivating Criminality 6. Metamorphoses of Crime: Facts and Fictions, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy, June 12 – 15, 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>’White noir’ in Sàpmi: Lars Pettersson’s novels
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Lars Pettersson’s three crime novels Kautokeino, en blodig kniv (“Kautokeino, a bloodied knife,” 2012), Slaktmånad (“Slaughter month,” 2014), and Mörkertid (“Time of darkness, ”2016) are all set in the region of Sápmi, land originally inhabited by the Sami people, north of the Arctic Circle. The paper argues that Pettersson challenges the contemporary neo-romantic trend of Swedish crime fiction, which is generally constituted of works devoid of political or social critique, and set in isolated, idyllic rural landscapes (see Kerstin Bergman 2012, 2014). In contrast, Pettersson’s novels deal with crimes taking place in a setting characterized by snow, ice and wind; and the harshness and inaccessibility of the environment echo in the behavior of the characters. The concept of “white noir” is proposed in order to explore the cynicism and alienation of the inhabitants of this snowy region, and to draw attention to Pettersson’s representations of how the racialization of the Sami people continues to affect present-day relationships. Finally, the potential of fiction to serve as a complement to journalism when it comes to the documentation of sensitive social issues, such as the treatment of the Sami people in Sweden, is considered.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19835 (URN)
Conference
Captivating Criminality 6. Metamorphoses of Crime: Facts and Fictions, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy, June 12 – 15, 2019.
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2018). Affect and nostalgia in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption. In: : . Paper presented at Nostalgia in Contemporary Culture, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, June 4 – 5, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affect and nostalgia in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on contemporary Scandinavian narratives of transnational/transcultural adoption from Korea. Recently there has been a surge in primarily autobiographical publications written by adoptees themselves, such as Maja Lee Langvad’s Hun er vred (2014), Sofia French’s På jakt efter Mr. Kim i Seoul (2005), and Astrid Trotzig’s Blod är tjockare än vatten (1996). It has been pointed out that the life writing of adoptees is the most “radical” literature in Sweden today, addressing the global inequalities at the heart of transnational adoption (Svenska Dagbladet, 18 October 2015). While recognizing the progressive impetus of these texts, this paper focuses on their retrospective aspects. The texts of Langvad, French and Trotzig all center on the writer’s return to Korea; a journey that is connected to an idea of the past as holding the key to a significant part of one’s identity. To the adoptee writers, the past is literally ‘a foreign country’ and the story of this past is riddled with gaps and uncertainties reflecting the adoptee’s unknown and often unknowable origins. My analysis suggests that nostalgia in adoption literature is closely related to various figures of maternity, and that the longing for the mother is often translated into a longing for the mother country and its culture. The texts articulate intense emotions, such as melancholia, anger, and a keen sense of loss, and the paper concludes by considering the role of affect in contemporary adoption literature.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19838 (URN)
Conference
Nostalgia in Contemporary Culture, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, June 4 – 5, 2018.
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2018). Kinship and text in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption. In: : . Paper presented at Close Relations: Critical Studies of Family and Kinship, Uppsala University, October 24 – 26, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinship and text in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the connection between life writing and kinship in a number of narratives by adoptees from South Korea to the US as well as Scandinavia, such as American Katy Robinson’s A Single Square Picture (2002), Jane Jeong Trenka’s The Language of Blood (2003) and Fugitive Visions (2009), and Soojung Jo’s Ghost of Sangju (2015); and Swedish Astrid Trotzig’s Blod är tjockare än vatten (1996), Sofia French’s På jakt efter Mr. Kim i Seoul (2005), and Danish Maja Lee Langvad’s Hun er vred (”She is Angry” 2014).

I propose that these texts are examples of narrative kinning, an exploration and creation of kinship through text and between texts. Thus, my understanding of this term is twofold. First, for these writers, the texts provide a discursive space in which alternative modes of identity and kinship can be envisioned and embodied. Second, I suggest that the formal features of the texts are sufficiently similar to exemplify a form of narrative kinning, and that the Korean adoptee memoir could be considered a genre-in-progress. The paper traces similarities of voice, structure, themes and tone between American and Scandinavian narratives of transnational/transracial adoption. More particularly, the study shows how the first-person voice counters the parent-centric discourse of transnational/transracial adoption. Focusing on structure includes analyzing the search narrative and the home-away-home pattern, while themes like home and belonging; inauthenticity and adoption as consumption are probed. Finally, the analysis of tone suggests that the affective register of the memoirs ranges from melancholia to anger.

Keywords
Transnational adoption – memoir – kinship – genre – transracial adoption – autobiography – adoptee identity – affect
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19836 (URN)
Conference
Close Relations: Critical Studies of Family and Kinship, Uppsala University, October 24 – 26, 2018.
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2018). The global subjects of contemporary Korean American adoptee narratives. In: The global subjects of Korean-American adoptee narratives: . Paper presented at 10th Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (SAAS): Open Covenants: Pasts and Futures of Global America¸ Stockholm University, September 28- 30, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The global subjects of contemporary Korean American adoptee narratives
2018 (English)In: The global subjects of Korean-American adoptee narratives, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the first decades of the 21st century, a range of autobiographical narratives dealing with adoption from South Korea to the U.S. have been published, such as Katy Robinson’s A Single Square Picture (2002), Jane Jeong Trenka’s The Language of Blood (2003) and Fugitive Visions (2009), and Soojung Jo’s Ghost of Sangju (2015). Embodying two cultures and two races, the transnational/transracial adoptee can be seen as an example of globalization from within U. S. culture. This paper focuses on how issues of identity, race and belonging are negotiated in the life writing of transnational/transracial adoptees. Eng and Han (2000) suggest that the Asian adoptee suffers from “racial melancholia,” which stems from having to navigate Asianness and whiteness without the support of an immigrant community. The relationship between affect and belonging is further probed through the use of Sara Ahmed’s discussion of the melancholic migrant (“Multiculturalism and the Promise of Happiness,” 2007), and the arguments concerning anger made by critical race theorists, such as bell hooks (Killing Rage, 1996). Yet another aspect of the global scope of the literature are the similar types of narratives that are now being written in Scandinavia. The paper concludes by drawing parallels between the works of Danish Maja Lee Langvad and Swedish Astrid Trotzig, and the American adoptee narratives.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19837 (URN)
Conference
10th Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (SAAS): Open Covenants: Pasts and Futures of Global America¸ Stockholm University, September 28- 30, 2018.
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2018). Whose memory?: contemporary narratives of the Japanese-American world war II internment. In: Regina Rudaityté (Ed.), History,memory and nostalgia in literature and culture: (pp. 157-172). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whose memory?: contemporary narratives of the Japanese-American world war II internment
2018 (English)In: History,memory and nostalgia in literature and culture / [ed] Regina Rudaityté, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018, p. 157-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19120 (URN)1-5275-0876-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2017). Nostalgia in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption. In: : . Paper presented at Nostalgia in Contemporary European Culture, Linnaeus University, June 14, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nostalgia in contemporary narratives of transnational adoption
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There has been a surge of transnational adoption narratives--both American and Scandinavian-- in recent years, which raise a number of questions about identity, belonging and the role of the individual and historical past. This workshop presentation discusses how the past is represented in literature about transnational adoption, asking questions like: What is the meaning of yearning for a place (the birth country) and/or people one has very few memories of and yet feels connected to in a multitude of ways? How can we understand a nostalgia formed by what are often pre-verbal memories in these texts? To what extent is this nostalgia maternally coded?

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19839 (URN)
Conference
Nostalgia in Contemporary European Culture, Linnaeus University, June 14, 2017.
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. & Freij, M. (2016). Feedback and (self-) assesment. Högskolepedagogisk debatt (2), 79-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feedback and (self-) assesment
2016 (English)In: Högskolepedagogisk debatt, ISSN 2000-9216, no 2, p. 79-86Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press, 2016
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16283 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved
Freij, M. & Ahlin, L. (2016). (Re-)examining the essay: alternative approaches to writing assessment. In: : . Paper presented at NU2016, Malmö, June 16..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(Re-)examining the essay: alternative approaches to writing assessment
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19925 (URN)
Conference
NU2016, Malmö, June 16.
Available from: 2019-08-30 Created: 2019-08-30 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2016). Whose Memory?: Contemporary Narratives of the Japanese American World War II Incarceration. In: : . Paper presented at History, Memory, Nostalgia. Literary and Cultural Representations, Department of English Philology, Vilnius University, Lithuania, September 29-October 1, 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whose Memory?: Contemporary Narratives of the Japanese American World War II Incarceration
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses the contemporary surge of narratives about the post-Pearl Harbor incarceration of 120, 000 Japanese Americans. There are a number of incarceration narratives written by third-generation Japanese Americans, like Julie Otsuka’s When the Emperor Was Divine (2002) and Kimi Cunningham Grant’s Silver Like Dust (2011). These early 21st- century narratives no longer embody the lived memories of the generation that was imprisoned, but the mediated, imagined memories transmitted to the next generation in a way that resonates with Hirsch’s concept of “postmemory” (2008). In these writings, the personal and family past is often merged with the public past, as the unearthing of what actually happened at camp is closely linked to the search for identity and an answer to what it means to be a Japanese American. In contrast, the purely fictional works by non-Japanese authors, such as Sandra Dallas’ Tallgrass (2007) and Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky (2014), raise the question of the ownership of memory.

An important starting point for my analysis is the recognition that literature has an important role to play in “creating shared narratives and hence in collectivizing memory” (Rigney 2012), which begs the question of who gets to formulate these shared narratives. What might be at stake when this historical trauma is depicted by authors who do not have the personal relationship to it that the Japanese American authors do? Are Dallas and others broadening national self-understanding, or do they commodify the incarceration as an exciting topic of historical fiction lending itself readily to motifs of secrecy, betrayal, and guilt? These issues are explored in relation to Landsberg’s theory of prosthetic memory (2004) and Levy and Sznaider’s concept “cosmopolitan memory” (2002).

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19842 (URN)
Conference
History, Memory, Nostalgia. Literary and Cultural Representations, Department of English Philology, Vilnius University, Lithuania, September 29-October 1, 2016.
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L. (2015). "All we wanted to do, now that we were back in the world, was forget": on remembrance and forgetting in Julie Otsuka's novels. American Studies in Scandinavia, 47(2), 81-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"All we wanted to do, now that we were back in the world, was forget": on remembrance and forgetting in Julie Otsuka's novels
2015 (English)In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 81-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers Julie Otsuka's representations of the World-War-II internment of Japanese Americans in When the Emperor Was Divine (2002) and The Buddha in the Attic (2011) from the perspective of collective remembrance, thus highlighting the interconnectedness of remembrance, forgetting, silence and race. Remembering and forgetting are understood as contingent on one another, and on the ideological currents and countercurrents that affect the construction of collective remembrance. The article argues that the content and form of Otsuka's novels mediate the cultural silence of the internment. In addition, they illustrate the changing nature of the narrativized remembrance of the internment as accounts of the lived experience of the Japanese Americans who went to camp are being replaced by trans-generationally transmitted, imaginatively recreated memories. The historical silence of the incarceration and its aftermath is sometimes explained in terms of "Japanese culture," but such a description risks reducing the impact of the racialization of Japanese Americans, and obscuring its effect on resistance. Finally, the analysis demonstrates that in Otsuka's texts, remembrance of the internment is characterized by a negotiation between repressive erasure and restorative forgetting.

Keywords
Otsuka, remembrance, forgetting, silence, Japanese Americans, internment
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15101 (URN)000364606600006 ()
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3020-7814

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