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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Lenninger, S. M. (2019). Barns semiotiska frihet och om rätten att bli hörd. In: Lina Ponnert, Anna Sonander & Per Wickenberg (Ed.), Perspektiv på barnkonventionen: . Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barns semiotiska frihet och om rätten att bli hörd
2019 (Swedish)In: Perspektiv på barnkonventionen / [ed] Lina Ponnert, Anna Sonander & Per Wickenberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18810 (URN)9789144125015 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-07
Lenninger, S. M. (2019). The metaphor and the iconic attitude. Cognitive Semiotics, 12(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The metaphor and the iconic attitude
2019 (English)In: Cognitive Semiotics, ISSN 2235-2066, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses visual metaphors and aspects of similarity in relation to metaphors. The concept of metaphor should here be understood as a semiotic unit that is also a sign (cf. Ricœur, P. 1986. The Rule of Metaphor: Multi-Disciplinary Studies of the Creation of Meaning in Language. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.). This implies that not all semiotic units are signs, but also that not all signs are typical metaphors. The metaphor is a particular kind of sign because of its making use of the openness present in similarity relations. Metaphorical meaning making is related to a quality of vagueness in iconic sign relations. Furthermore, a notion of iconic attitude is proposed as a designation of subjective and intersubjective perspectives that might be taken on meanings founded on similarity. The iconic attitude mirrors the flexibility of thought and responds to the potentiality of vagueness in iconic sign relations; but, at the same time, the iconic attitude works as a stabilizing factor for meaning. Moreover, this attitude is crucial for the specification of the similarity relation in an actual sign experience with an iconic ground.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mouton de Gruyter, 2019
Keywords
Metaphor, similarity, visual, semiotics
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19829 (URN)10.1515/cogsem-2019-2011 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Lenninger, S. M. (2017). Culture in the layers of contemporary discourses and historical archives: a review of Anna Maria Larusso's Cultural Semiotics [Review]. The public journal of semiotics, 8(1), 67-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Culture in the layers of contemporary discourses and historical archives: a review of Anna Maria Larusso's Cultural Semiotics
2017 (English)In: The public journal of semiotics, ISSN 1918-9907, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 67-76Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Anna Maria Lorusso’s book Cultural semiotics: For a cultural perspective in semiotics (Lorusso, 2015) the reader is offered an initiated review of key representatives of 20th century structuralism in semiotics and its entries into poststructuralism, with focus on method of analysis. Related to the theoretical discussions on semiotics and culture, Lorusso offers a series of case studies in semiotic analysis of cultural texts. In this review article, I discuss and evaluate the four strands in cultural semiotics suggested by Lorusso. Further, I draw implications for deciding on the themes and objects of studies in a semiotic realm that focuses on text.

Keywords
Semiotics, Structuralism, Interpretation, Regularisation
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17615 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Lenninger, S. M., Sinha, C. & Sonesson, G. (2015). Editorial introduction: semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution. Cognitive development, 36(Oct/Dec), 127-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial introduction: semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution
2015 (English)In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 36, no Oct/Dec, p. 127-129Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Psychology and semiotics, semiotic development, semiosis, human development
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15201 (URN)10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.09.003 (DOI)
Projects
Special sections in Cognitive Development: Semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution
Available from: 2016-01-17 Created: 2016-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Sonesson, G. & Lenninger, S. M. (2015). The psychological development of semiotic competence: from the window to the movie by way of the mirror. Cognitive development, 36(Oct/Dec), 191-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The psychological development of semiotic competence: from the window to the movie by way of the mirror
2015 (English)In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 36, no Oct/Dec, p. 191-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychologists have been interested in the mirror image chiefly as a device permitting the subject to discover his/her self-representation, and semioticians have denied that the mirror image could be a kind of sign. In the present paper, our intention is to develop a framework for realising a detailed comparison between perceptual reality, as seen in a peephole, and mirror images, as well a streaming video and pre-recorded video. In the first section, we introduce the semiotic notion of sign, using precise criteria to assure that the mirror image, as used by adults, functions as a sign. In the second section, experimental studies comparing some constellations of perceptual reality, mirror images, and video strips are scrutinized, and we report briefly the results of a study which we ourselves set up to investigate the capacities of 2 year old children to understand an object choice task conveyed by means in those four kinds of media. The result suggests that continuity, which is the opposite of differentiation defining the sign, is still important for enabling the understanding of the task in children at this age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Sign, video, mirror, contiguity, psychological development
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15200 (URN)10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.09.007 (DOI)
Projects
Special sections in Cognitive Development: Semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution
Available from: 2016-01-17 Created: 2016-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Lenninger, S. M. (2015). When the other's responses are unpredictable; why does the baby still pay attention to the interaction?. In: Kull, Kalevi (Ed.), Semiotic (un)predictability: . Paper presented at The 9th conference of Nordic Association for Semiotic Studies.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When the other's responses are unpredictable; why does the baby still pay attention to the interaction?
2015 (English)In: Semiotic (un)predictability / [ed] Kull, Kalevi, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a study on young infants’ susceptibility to synchronic behaviours in dyadic interactions with others the children’s responses indicated tolerance in their interpretation of the situation. When 6 months old infants encountered a communicative other who did not match to the infants’ communicative behaviours the young infants nevertheless remained focused on the interaction. Moreover, the infants made efforts to intervene and take action in the communicative event.

An increasing number of studies support the assumption that dyadic, dynamic and mutual interactions can be traced in communicative and affective relations between caregivers and infants from early infancy (Beebe et al 1985, Bråthen 2009, Stern 1985, Rochat 2009, Trevarthen & Murray 1985). According to Murray and Trevarthen (1985) already 6 -12 weeks old infants detect and respond to structural features in the caretaker’s behaviour in such a way that the caretaker, in its turn, is evoked to respond with a matching behaviour. When the infants are between 2-4 months old stable sequences characterize parent-infant face-to-face dyads (Levelli & Fogel 2002). Together, the studies indicate that at the age of 6 months children can be expected to have expectations on the behaviour of the other in communication games. Further, these expectations influence the child’s participation and understanding of the event.

When studying semiotic development in young children not only developmental aspects of growing children should be examined but also the means by which children encounter meaning and communication. In my presentation, the dyadic interaction in our study will be analysed in respect of the dynamic potentialities that are framed in communication games with young infants.

National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15203 (URN)
Conference
The 9th conference of Nordic Association for Semiotic Studies
Note

Ytterligare finansiär: Lunds Universitet

Available from: 2016-01-17 Created: 2016-01-17 Last updated: 2016-01-18Bibliographically approved
Madsen, E. A., Persson, T., Sayehli, S., Lenninger, S. M. & Sonesson, G. (2013). Chimpanzees show a developmental increase in susceptibility to contagious yawning: a test of the effect of ontogeny and emotional closeness on yawn contagion. PLoS ONE, 8(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chimpanzees show a developmental increase in susceptibility to contagious yawning: a test of the effect of ontogeny and emotional closeness on yawn contagion
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contagious yawning has been reported for humans, dogs and several non-human primate species, and associated with empathy in humans and other primates. Still, the function, development and underlying mechanisms of contagious yawning remain unclear. Humans and dogs show a developmental increase in susceptibility to yawn contagion, with children showing an increase around the age of four, when also empathy-related behaviours and accurate identification of others' emotions begin to clearly evince. Explicit tests of yawn contagion in non-human apes have only involved adult individuals and examined the existence of conspecific yawn contagion. Here we report the first study of heterospecific contagious yawning in primates, and the ontogeny of susceptibility thereto in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus. We examined whether emotional closeness, defined as attachment history with the yawning model, affected the strength of contagion, and compared the contagiousness of yawning to nose-wiping. Thirty-three orphaned chimpanzees observed an unfamiliar and familiar human (their surrogate human mother) yawn, gape and nose-wipe. Yawning, but not nose-wiping, was contagious for juvenile chimpanzees, while infants were immune to contagion. Like humans and dogs, chimpanzees are subject to a developmental trend in susceptibility to contagious yawning, and respond to heterospecific yawn stimuli. Emotional closeness with the model did not affect contagion. The familiarity-biased social modulatory effect on yawn contagion previously found among some adult primates, seem to only emerge later in development, or be limited to interactions with conspecifics. The influence of the 'chameleon effect', targeted vs. generalised empathy, perspective-taking and visual attention on contagious yawning is discussed.

Keywords
contagious yawning, empathy, chimpanzees, development
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15198 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0076266 (DOI)24146848 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-16 Created: 2016-01-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Zlatev, J. (2013). Understanding communicative intentions and semiotic vehicles by children and chimpanzees. Cognitive development, 28(3), 312-329
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding communicative intentions and semiotic vehicles by children and chimpanzees
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2013 (English)In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 312-329Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Developmental and comparative studies of the ability to understand communicative intentions using object-choice tasks raise questions concerning the semiotic properties of the communicative signals, and the roles of rearing histories, language and familiarity. We adapted a study by Tomasello, Call, and Gluckman (1997), in which a “helper” indicated the location of a hidden reward to children of three ages (18, 24, and 30 months) and to four chimpanzees, by means of one of four cues: Pointing, Marker, Picture and Replica. For the chimpanzees, we controlled for familiarity by using two helpers, one unfamiliar and one highly familiar. Even 18-months performed well on Pointing and Marker, while only the oldest group clearly succeeded with Picture and Replica. Performance did not correlate with scores for the Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI). While there were no positive results for the chimpanzees on the group level, and no effect of familiarity, two chimpanzees succeeded on Pointing and Marker. Results support proposals of a species difference in understanding communicative intentions, but also highlight the need to distinguish these from the complexity of semiotic vehicles and to consider both factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Conventionality, familiarity, iconicity, indexicality, object-choice, pointing
National Category
Other Humanities Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15202 (URN)10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.05.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-17 Created: 2016-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Lenninger, S. M. (2012). When similarity qualifies as a sign: a study in picture understanding and semiotic development in young children. (Doctoral dissertation). Lund: Avdelningen för semiotik, Humanistiska fakulteten, Lunds Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When similarity qualifies as a sign: a study in picture understanding and semiotic development in young children
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The general goal of this thesis is to elucidate children’s early understandings of pictorial meanings, and how one can know anything about them. My central aim is to explore how picture comprehension develops during children’s first 3 years of life, through semiotic-theory-derived analyses of meaning relations. In so doing, I hope to contribute to the study of both semiotic theory’s psychological basis and the role of semiotic processes in cognitive development: specifically, in children’s experiences of pictorial meanings.

In an experimental object retrieval test, including pictures, I show the importance of studying concrete instances of children’s experiences. Among its key results is that, for a group of children who are close to the threshold of being able to use the picture to solve the retrieval task, indexical cuing assists their understanding. 

One central claims is that the picture sign reflects a dual semiotic process: on the one hand, picture understanding relies on recognition of perceptual similarities; on the other, it draws on communicative processes that are intrinsic to all sign constructions. This duality is particularly interesting when it comes to looking at children’s development of picture understanding. Through similarity relations, children perceive accurate – but initially private, and semiotically premature – understanding of pictures. At the same time though, children are alert to communicative meanings from the start. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Avdelningen för semiotik, Humanistiska fakulteten, Lunds Universitet, 2012. p. 202
Keywords
Semiotic development, children, picture, communication, iconicity
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15199 (URN)978-91-7473-375-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-10-01, Språk- och litteraturcentrum, Helgonabacken, Lund, 12:25 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Språk, gester och bilder i ett semiotiskt utvecklingsperspektivCentrum för kognitiv semiotik
Available from: 2016-01-20 Created: 2016-01-16 Last updated: 2017-08-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3257-4872

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