hkr.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Augustine, L., Lygnegård, F., Granlund, M. & Adolfsson, M. (2017). Linking youths' mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: lessons learned. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(19), 2293-2299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking youths' mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: lessons learned
2017 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 19, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

RESULTS: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

CONCLUSION: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item. Implications for rehabilitation The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents' mental functioning in different life domains. Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information. By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems. The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

Keywords
Mental health, adolescents, linking rules, participation
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16834 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1334238 (DOI)000440026500010 ()28573885 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Huus, K., Olsson, L. M., Elgmark Andersson, E., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2017). Perceived needs among parents of children with a mild intellectual disability in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, 19(4), 307-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived needs among parents of children with a mild intellectual disability in Sweden
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 307-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents of children with a mild intellectual disability experience more distress and require more support than other parents. The aim was to investigate the perceived family needs of parents of children with an MID and to investigate the relationship between parents’ perceived self-efficacy in their parental role and in collaborating with professionals as well as with their perceived needs for support. Interviews were based on questionnaires to the parents of 38 children. The results revealed that parents perceived need for information, respite, and venues in which to meet other parents in similar situations. The informational needs were related to parental self-efficacy and obtaining support. A lower need for information was related to higher perceived control over services. In conclusion, it appears that professionals need to work to strengthen parents’ ability to ask for support and to express the needs. Well-informed parents will develop stronger parental self-efficacy and perceived control over services.

Keywords
Child, intellectual disability, need assessment, self-efficacy
National Category
Social Work Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15391 (URN)10.1080/15017419.2016.1167773 (DOI)000419256200003 ()
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Ng, K., Tynjälä, J., Sigmundová, D., Augustine, L., Sentenac, M., Rintala, P. & Inchley, J. (2017). Physical activity among adolescents with long-term Illnesses or disabilities in 15 European countries. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 34(4), 456-465
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity among adolescents with long-term Illnesses or disabilities in 15 European countries
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 456-465Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity (PA) is an important health-promoting behavior from which adolescents with long-term illnesses or disabilities (LTID) can benefit. It is important to monitor differences across countries in adherence with PA recommendations for health. The aim of this study was to compare PA levels among 15 European countries after disaggregating data by disability. Data from pupils (mean age = 13.6 years, SD = 1.64) participating in the 2013/2014 Health Behavior in School-aged Children study were analyzed to compare adolescents without LTID, with LTID, and with LTID that affects their participation (affected LTID). Logistic regression models adjusted for age and family affluence, stratified by gender and country group with PA recommendations for health as the outcome variable. With the data pooled, 15% (n = 9,372) of adolescents reported having LTID and 4% (n = 2,566) having affected LTID. Overall, fewer boys with LTID met PA recommendations for health than boys without LTID, although it was not statistically significant either at the national levels or for girls.

Keywords
Chronic conditions, disability, health, inclusion, mainstream schools
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17419 (URN)10.1123/apaq.2016-0138 (DOI)000414685100007 ()28985099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2017-11-23Bibliographically approved
Sonmark, K., Godeau, E., Augustine, L., Bygren, M. & Modin, B. (2016). Individual and contextual expressions of school demands and their relation to psychosomatic health: a comparative study of students in France and Sweden. Child Indicators Research, 9(1), 93-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual and contextual expressions of school demands and their relation to psychosomatic health: a comparative study of students in France and Sweden
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the health-related implications of both individual students’ and class-level concentrations of perceived demands in terms of pressuring, difficult and tiring schoolwork in France and Sweden, two countries with substantial differences in their educational systems and recent notable differences in PISA-results. Data come from Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (2001/02, 2005/06 and 2009/10) and comprise a total of 33,243 students aged 11, 13 and 15. Findings show that feeling under pressure from schoolwork is less prevalent in Sweden than in France among 11 and 13-year olds, but almost twice as common among 15-year olds. Yet its correlation with 15-year olds’ psychosomatic complaints is stronger in France than in Sweden. Feeling tired by schoolwork is equally common for 11- and 13-year olds in the two countries, but more frequent among 15-year olds in Sweden. It is also a stronger predictor of psychosomatic complaints in Sweden than in France across all age-groups. While it is more common at all ages to perceive the schoolwork as difficult in France, its relationship with psychosomatic complaints is stronger among students in Sweden. The proportion of classmates reporting high school demands is also linked to poorer student health, but these effects were largely confined to girls in both countries.

Keywords
School pressure, school-related stress, psychosomatic health, multilevel analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13707 (URN)10.1007/s12187-015-9299-1 (DOI)000375409300006 ()
Available from: 2015-03-10 Created: 2015-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Fismen, A.-S., Smith, O. R., Torsheim, T., Rasmussen, M., Pedersen Pagh, T., Augustine, L., . . . Samdal, O. (2016). Trends in food habits and their relation to socioeconomic status among Nordic adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010. PLoS ONE, 11(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in food habits and their relation to socioeconomic status among Nordic adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries.

Methods

The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data.

Results

Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft drink consumption. Socioeconomic inequalities in fruit and vegetable consumption were observed in all countries, with no cross-country differences, and no changes over time. Small but not significant cross-country variation was identified for SES inequalities in sweet consumption. Reduced SES inequalities were observed in Sweden between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. SES was not associated with soft drink consumption in this study population, with the exception of Denmark for the survey year 2009/2010.

Conclusion

Different trends resulted in increased country differences in food habits during the time of observations. In survey year 2009/2010, Danish students reported a higher intake of fruit and vegetable consumption than their counterparts in the other Nordic countries. Finnish students reported the lowest frequency of sweets and soft drink consumption. Despite the positive dietary trends documented in the present study, the majority of Nordic adolescents are far from meeting national dietary recommendations. Our findings underline the need for more comprehensive initiatives targeting young people's food habits as well as a more deliberate and focused action to close gaps in social inequalities that affect food choices.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15302 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0148541 (DOI)000370038400051 ()
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ottová-Jordan, V., Smith, O. R. F., Augustine, L., Gobina, I., Rathmann, K., Torsheim, T., . . . Ravens-Sieberer, U. (2015). Trends in health complaints from 2002 to 2010 in 34 countries and their association with health behaviours and social context factors at individual and macro-level. European Journal of Public Health, 25(2), 83-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in health complaints from 2002 to 2010 in 34 countries and their association with health behaviours and social context factors at individual and macro-level
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This article describes trends and stability over time in health complaints in adolescents from 2002 to 2010 and investigates associations between health complaints, behavioural and social contextual factors at individual level and economic factors at macro-level.

METHODS: Comprising N = 510 876 11-, 13- and 15-year-old children and adolescents in Europe, North America and Israel, data came from three survey cycles of the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Age- and gender-adjusted trends in health complaints were examined in each country by means of linear regression. By using the country as the random effects variable, we tested to what extent individual and contextual variables were associated with health complaints.

RESULTS: Significant associations are stronger for individual level determinants (e.g. being bullied, smoking) than for determinants at macro-level (e.g. GDP, Gini), as can be seen by the small effect sizes (less than 5% for different trends). Health complaints are fairly stable over time in most countries, and no clear international trend in health complaints can be observed between 2002 and 2010. The most prominent stable determinants were being female, being bullied, school pressure and smoking.

CONCLUSION: Factors associated with health complaints are more related to the proximal environment than to distal macro-level factors. This points towards intensifying targeted interventions, (e.g. for bullying) and also targeting specific risk groups. The comparably small effect size at country-level indicates that country-level factors have an impact on health and should not be ignored.

Keywords
Subjective health, physical-activity, young adulthood, adolescents, school, multilevel, gender, inequalities, depression, stress
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13754 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckv033 (DOI)000362971500021 ()25805796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Ottová-Jordan, V., Smith, O. R. .., Gobina, I., Mazur, J., Augustine, L., Cavallo, F., . . . Ravens-Sieberer, U. (2015). Trends in Multiple Recurrent health complaitns in 15-year-olds in 35 countries in Europe, North America and Israel from 1994 to 2010. European Journal of Public Health, 25(suppl 2), 24-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in Multiple Recurrent health complaitns in 15-year-olds in 35 countries in Europe, North America and Israel from 1994 to 2010
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no suppl 2, p. 24-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Health complaints are a good indicator of an individual's psychosocial health and well-being. Studies have shown that children and adolescents report health complaints which can cause significant individual burden.

METHODS: Using data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, this article describes trends in multiple recurrent health complaints (MHC) in 35 countries among N = 237 136 fifteen-year-olds from 1994 to 2010. MHC was defined as the presence of two or more health complaints at least once a week. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate trends across the five survey cycles for each country.

RESULTS: Lowest prevalence throughout the period 1994-2010 was 16.9% in 1998 in Austria and highest in 2006 in Israel (54.7%). Overall, six different trend patterns could be identified: No linear or quadratic trend (9 countries), linear decrease (7 countries), linear increase (5 countries), U-shape (4 countries), inverted U-shape (6 countries) and unstable (4 countries).

CONCLUSION: Trend analyses are valuable in providing hints about developments in populations as well as for benchmarking and evaluation purposes. The high variation in health complaints between the countries requires further investigation, but may also reflect the subjective nature of health complaints.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13756 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckv015 (DOI)25805782 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4079-8902

Search in DiVA

Show all publications