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Fridberg, Marie
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Fridberg, M., Thulin, S. & Redfors, A. (2017). Preschool children's collaborative science learning scaffolded by tablets. Research in science education, 48(5), 1007-1026
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool children's collaborative science learning scaffolded by tablets
2017 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1007-1026Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a project aiming to extend the current understanding of how emerging technologies, i.e. tablets, can be used in preschools to support collaborative learning of real-life science phenomena. The potential of tablets to support collaborative inquiry-based science learning and reflective thinking in preschool is investigated through the analysis of teacher-led activities on science, including children making timelapse photography and Slowmation movies. A qualitative analysis of verbal communication during different learning contexts gives rise to a number of categories that distinguish and identify different themes of the discussion. In this study, groups of children work with phase changes of water. We report enhanced and focused reasoning about this science phenomenon in situations where timelapse movies are used to stimulate recall. Furthermore, we show that children communicate in a more advanced manner about the phenomenon, and they focus more readily on problem solving when active in experimentation or Slowmation producing contexts.

Keywords
Preschool, tablets, timelapse, Slowmation, early childhood education
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16318 (URN)10.1007/s11165-016-9596-9 (DOI)000445248900007 ()
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved
Stanezai, S., Sahlen, E., El-Schich, Z., Fridberg, M., Fredriksson, G. N., Anagnostaki, L., . . . Gjorloff Wingren, A. (2016). Higher intensity of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase/ ACP-1 in survivors of patients diagnosed with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to non-survivors. Austin Biology (2), Article ID 1009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher intensity of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase/ ACP-1 in survivors of patients diagnosed with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to non-survivors
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Austin Biology, no 2, article id 1009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adult Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous form of hematopoietic cancer and difficult to treat. In order to find a better diagnostic indication for the disease, we analyzed Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) that in humans is encoded by the ACP1 gene. LMWPTP is an enzyme shown to counteract Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTK) and was suggested to be a negative growth factor regulator. However, the 18 kDa PTP can also have a positive effect on cell growth and proliferation, indicating a controversial role in the tumorigenic process. LMWPTP exists in different isoforms which are electrophoretically, kinetically and immunologically distinct. We have studied two subgroups of DLBCL consisting of a Germinal Center B cell like (GCB) and a non-Germinal Center B cell like (non-GCB) group. The two subgroups have been defined by gene-expressing profiling and are associated with differential outcome. The expression levels of LMWPTP protein was compared and showed significant differences between the GCB and non- GCB subgroups (p=0.012). Interestingly, when the samples were divided into survivors and non-survivors, and thereafter analyzed for LMWPTP expression, the samples from patients with a higher survival rate showed increased staining intensity, whereas the samples from patients with lower intensity of LMWPTP did not survive the disease (p=0.001). In conclusion, we have shown that DLBCL patients with worse outcome express LMWPTP with a lower intensity, suggesting a tumor suppressor role for this form of the enzyme.

Keywords
ACP1, B cell, DLBCL, Germinal center, LMWPTP, Lymphoma, Non-germinal center, Prognosis
National Category
Medical Bioscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17542 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2017-10-25Bibliographically approved
Fridberg, M. & Redfors, A. (2016). Naturvetenskap och datorplattor – i barnens regi. In: Susanne Thulin (Ed.), Naturvetenskap i ett förskoleperspektiv: kreativa lärandeprocesser (pp. 105-124). Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Naturvetenskap och datorplattor – i barnens regi
2016 (Swedish)In: Naturvetenskap i ett förskoleperspektiv: kreativa lärandeprocesser / [ed] Susanne Thulin, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, p. 105-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16206 (URN)9789140694669 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Fridberg, M., Redfors, A. & Thulin, S. (2016). Science in early childhood education: children and tablets. In: : . Paper presented at EECERA (European Early Childhood Education Research Association)‘HAPPINESS, RELATIONSHIPS, EMOTION & DEEP LEVEL LEARNING’, Dublin, Ireland, 31st August – 3rd September 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science in early childhood education: children and tablets
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research aims

To extend current understanding of how emerging technologies, i.e tablets, can be used in pre-schools to support collaborative learning of real-life science phenomena.

Relationship to previous research works

We continue our study of the potential of tablets as scaffolds in collaborative inquiry-based science

learning in preschools. We investigate the role of Timelapse photography and Slowmation production in scaffolding communication and learning during work with light and shadow. The teaching attempts to synthesise the two domains defined by Eshach (2006) for children´s science learning: content and

investigations.

Theoretical and conceptual framework

The theoretical framework is primarily based on phenomenography focusing on developmental pedagogy. (Marton & Booth, 1997, Pramling Samuelsson & Asplund Carlsson, 2008).

Paradigm, methodology and methods

Design-based research (Barab & Squire, 2004) is used to bridge the worlds of academia with the realities of educational practice, to foster viable practices. A mixed-methods approach, including video and qualitative and quantitative data measures is used.

Ethical Considerations

The research will adhere to the ethical guidelines of the Swedish Research Council. All participants and children’s caregivers are informed and agree to voluntary and anonymous participation with a right to abandon participation.

Main finding or discussion

In this paper we report on an on-going project where children investigate light and shadow by constructing, discussing, formulating and using explanatory models during work with time-lapse and Slowmations. (Fridberg et al. 2016).

Implications, practice or policy

The potential of teachers, students and researchers jointly developing, enacting and evaluating learning processes supported by ubiquitous technologies in pre-school will be discussed. Slowmation production focus explanatory models of science experiences and elicits critical aspects of the learning object.

Keywords
Emergent science, pre-school, ubiquitous technologies, collaborative learning, physics
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15740 (URN)
Conference
EECERA (European Early Childhood Education Research Association)‘HAPPINESS, RELATIONSHIPS, EMOTION & DEEP LEVEL LEARNING’, Dublin, Ireland, 31st August – 3rd September 2016
Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved
Stanezai, S., Sahlén, E., El-Schich, Z., Fridberg, M., Fredrikson, G., Anagnostaki, L., . . . Gjörloff Wingren, A. (2016). Tyrosine Phosphatase/ ACP-1 in survivors of patients diagnosed with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to non-survivors. Austin Biology, 1(2), Article ID 1009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tyrosine Phosphatase/ ACP-1 in survivors of patients diagnosed with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to non-survivors
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Austin Biology, Vol. 1, no 2, article id 1009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
ACP1, B cell, DLBCL, Germinal center, LMWPTP, Lymphoma, Non-germinal center, Prognosis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15673 (URN)
Available from: 2016-08-10 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2016-08-10Bibliographically approved
Fridberg, M., Redfors, A. & Thulin, S. (2015). Children’s collaborative learning of evaporation scaffolded by iPads. In: : . Paper presented at The 11th Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA), Helsinki, August 31 - September 4, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s collaborative learning of evaporation scaffolded by iPads
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a project aiming to extend the current understanding of how emerging technologies, i.e. iPads, can be used in pre-schools to support collaborative learning of real-life science phenomena. The importance of this is associated with the “west world” problem of current educational systems to respond to the needs of modern youth. Educational systems are currently in need of reform (Fullan, 2007, Thulin, 2011; Tytler, 2007). Research on the potential of web-based technologies to support collaborative inquiry-based science learning in schools, with a special interest in inquiry-based science learning is here continued by investigating the role of time-lapse and stop-motion animations in developing children’s understanding of science phenomena. We report on a study of groups of children working with evaporation. A video-based qualitative analysis of the communication in the pre-school groups has given rise to a number of categories used to distinguish and identify variations of children’s expressed experiences in discussions during group work in different contexts. An enhanced and focused reasoning about the natural science phenomenon in group discussions where the iPad is involved and used for stimulated recall is reported. Furthermore, it is shown that children communicate extensively about practical issues and problem solving, in stop-motion producing contexts, but less about the science phenomenon. However, when the children participate in real-time experimentation, the communication focuses more around the phenomenon itself and less about practical issues. Hence, again establishing the importance of real-time experimentation for children’s science learning. The analysis of the empirical data from the first phase of the project is on going and will be completed during the first months of 2015.  The final results will be presented at the conference.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14978 (URN)
Conference
The 11th Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA), Helsinki, August 31 - September 4, 2015
Available from: 2015-11-01 Created: 2015-11-01 Last updated: 2015-12-15Bibliographically approved
Redfors, A., Fridberg, M. & Thulin, S. (2014). On the potential of mobile and ubiquitous technologies to support collaborative processes with a science content in pre-schools. In: : . Paper presented at INTED conference 2014, 10-12 March, Valencia, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the potential of mobile and ubiquitous technologies to support collaborative processes with a science content in pre-schools
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We will present on a project that sets out to extend current understanding of how emerging technologies can be used by children and their pre-school teachers as socio-cognitive tools to support collaboration and reflection in investigating complex, real-life problems. The research group LISMA has previously been involved in work situated at the intersection of new information and communication technologies (ICTs), social cognition, and learning with research focused on examining the potential of web-based technologies to support social and psychological processes which are at the centre of learning, with a special interest in inquiry-based science learning to support active involvement, collaboration, cognitive flexibility, reflective and critical thinking, and the development of adaptive expertise (Redfors et al. 2013). Hence, we will synthesise the two domains defined by Eshach (2006) for kids’ science learning; content (concepts, explanatory models) and investigations (hypothesis, problematizing, questions, experiments). With this project we will take this line of work further and focus on the role of ubiquitous technologies in pre-schools.

 

The project methodology is based on the idea of design-based research (Barab & Squire, 2004). This approach seeks to bridge the often disconnected worlds of academia and theory with the realities, complexities, and constraints of educational practice. Design-based research is the most suitable methodological approach to the goals of this project, since its iterative, participatory, and evidence-based philosophy can foster the development of viable, empirically tested practices. The collaborative activities that we will create will be iteratively tested and refined, first as pilot projects, then during local implementations, and finally during implementations and synthesis work at a global level. This approach can ensure that the outcomes of such work can be used in other similar learning contexts. In the context of this approach, we will follow a mixed-methods approach, which will include qualitative and quantitative data collection measures.

 

We will report on the first phase of the project where we will work with pre- and in-service pre-school teachers developing Slowmations (Fleer, 2013; Hoban, 2007) to develop their own and children’s understanding of science phenomena. Slowmations (“SlowAnimation”) are software generated simple stop-motion animations played slowly at two frames per second. Children photograph objects, creating a sequence of photographic images, which they put together as a video clip, with self-generated narration to explain the phenomena. Research suggests that slowmations (Fleer 2013) helps children to more consciously consider concepts. Teachers and students (during VFU) will in collaboration with researchers in a design-based process develop, enact and evaluate slow-mations. Through a future international group we will be able to identify the critical attributes, the important constraints and the crucial characteristics of successful research-based activities.

Keywords
Emergent science; pre-school; ubiquitous technologies; collaborative learning
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12314 (URN)
Conference
INTED conference 2014, 10-12 March, Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2014-07-03 Created: 2014-07-03 Last updated: 2016-04-01Bibliographically approved
Fridberg, M., Redfors, A. & Thulin, S. (2014). The role of science in Swedish pre-schools: children’s collaborative learning scaffolded by iPads. In: : . Paper presented at 24rd EECERA Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of science in Swedish pre-schools: children’s collaborative learning scaffolded by iPads
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To extend current understanding of how emerging technologies, i.e. iPads, can be used in pre-schools to support collaborative learning of real-life science phenomena. Research on the potential of web-based technologies to support collaborative inquiry-based science learning in schools (Redfors et al. 2013) is continued by investigating the role of stop-motion animations (Fleer, 2013, Hoban, 2007) in developing children’s understanding of science phenomena, by synthesising the two domains defined by Eshach (2006) for kids’ science learning, content and investigations. The theoretical framework is primarily based on phenomenography focusing on developmental pedagogy (Marton & Booth, 1997, Pramling Samuelsson & Asplund Carlsson, 2008). Design-based research (Barab & Squire, 2004) is used to bridge the worlds of academia and theory with the realities, complexities, and constraints of educational practice, and foster viable practices. A mixed-methods approach, including video and qualitative and quantitative data measures is used. The research adheres to the ethical guidelines of the Swedish Research Council. All participants and children’s caregivers are informed and agree to voluntary and anonymous participation with a right to abandon participation. In this paper we report on the first phase of the project where videos of children’s work with constructing and discussing time-lapse and stop motion sequences of science phenomena have been analysed within our theoretical framework. Stop-motion animations (Fleer 2013) help children, teachers and students to more consciously consider concepts. We see a great potential in work where teachers, students and researchers jointly develop, enact and evaluate learning processes supported by ubiquitous technologies in pre-school.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13235 (URN)
Conference
24rd EECERA Conference
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2016-04-01Bibliographically approved
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