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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Hernroth, B. & Baden, S. (2018). Sjukare skaldjur i framtidens hav. HavsUtsik, 01
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sjukare skaldjur i framtidens hav
2018 (Swedish)In: HavsUtsik, Vol. 01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Klimatförändringarna försämrar immunförsvaret hos kräftor, musslor och sjöstjärnor, och gör att de lättare får infektioner. De smittsamma bakterierna och virusen ser däremot inte ut att fara illa i den förändrade miljön. En dålig kombination för ekosystemet, och för oss konsumenter av marina skaldjur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2018
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18597 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-23 Created: 2018-08-23 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Thorell, K., Collin, B., Hernroth, B. & Sjöling, Å. (2016). Complete genome sequences of two marine Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from the south coast of Sweden. Genome Announcements, 4(5), Article ID e01118-16.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complete genome sequences of two marine Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from the south coast of Sweden
2016 (English)In: Genome Announcements, ISSN 2169-8287, E-ISSN 2169-8287, Vol. 4, no 5, article id e01118-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 are commonly associated with diarrhea, while non-O1-O139 strains may cause wound infections. Here, we present the genome sequences of two V. cholerae strains isolated from blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) collected in coastal waters of southern Sweden.

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16264 (URN)10.1128/genomeA.01118-16 (DOI)27789632 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 348-2014-2639
Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Hernroth, B., Baden, S., Tassidis, H., Hörnaeus, K., Guillemant, J., Bergström Lind, S. & Bergquist, J. (2016). Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 55, 452-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)
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2016 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 55, p. 452-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65–90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5–3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens.

Keywords
Ocean acidification, Mytilus edulis, Antimicrobial peptide, Gill tissue, Vibrio, LPS, Proteome analysis, LC-Orbitrap MS/MS analysis
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15677 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2016.04.007 (DOI)000381537000048 ()27288994 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4423Swedish Research Council, 2015-4870 JB
Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-11 Last updated: 2017-09-19Bibliographically approved
Hernroth, B., Baden, S., Tassidis, H., Hörnaeus, K., Guillemant, J., Bergström Lind, S. & Bergquist, J. (2016). Impact of oceanacidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilusedulis). Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 55, 452-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of oceanacidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilusedulis)
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2016 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 55, p. 452-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-18683 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2016.04.007 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-08 Created: 2018-09-08 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Hörnaeus, K., Guillemant, J., Mi, J., Hernroth, B., Bergquist, J. & Bergström Lind, S. (2016). Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Data in Brief, 8, 470-473
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)
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2016 (English)In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 8, p. 470-473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2].

Keywords
avian influenza A virus, effect of infection, mallard, movement, stopover, transmission
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16093 (URN)10.1016/j.dib.2016.05.073 (DOI)27358907 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-28 Created: 2016-09-28 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Hernroth, B., Krång, A.-S. & Baden, S. (2015). Bacteriostatic suppression in Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) exposed to manganese or hypoxia under pressure of ocean acidification. Aquatic Toxicology, 159, 217-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacteriostatic suppression in Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) exposed to manganese or hypoxia under pressure of ocean acidification
2015 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 159, p. 217-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Future ocean acidification (OA) and warming following climate change elicit pervasive stressors to the inhabitants of the sea. Previous experimental exposure to OA for 16 weeks at pH levels predicted for 2100, has shown to result in serious immune suppression of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus. The lobsters are currently affected by stressors such as periodical hypoxia inducing high levels of bioavailable manganese (Mn). Here, we aimed to investigate possible effects of interactions between OA and these stressors on total hemocyte counts (THC) and on recovery of inoculated bacteria in the lobsters, measured as a proxy for bacteriostatic response. The effects were judged by following numbers of culturable Vibrio parahaemolyticus in hepatopancreas, 4 and 24 h post inoculation in lobsters kept in replicate tanks with six different treatments; either ambient (pCO2∼ 500 μatm/pH∼8.1 units) or CO2 manipulated seawater (OA; pCO2 1550 μatm/pH∼7.6 units) for 8 weeks. During the last two weeks additional stress of either hypoxia (∼23% oxygen saturation) or Mn (∼9 mgL−1) was added except in control treatments. Our results showed clear effect on bacteriostatic response in Norway lobsters exposed to these stressors. In lobster kept in ambient seawater without additional stressors the number of culturable bacteria in hepatopancreas was reduced by ∼ 34%. In combined treatment of ambient seawater and hypoxia the reduction was ∼23%, while in the Mn-exposed animals, there was no reduction at all. This was also the case in all OA-treatments where mean numbers of culturable V. parahaemolyticus tended to increase. In lobsters from ambient seawater with or without hypoxia, the total hemocyte count (THC) was not significantly different as was also the case in OA without additional stressors. However, in OA-treatments combined with either hypoxia or Mn, THC was reduced by ∼ 35%.While the reduction of culturable V. parahaemolyticus in lobsters was clearly affected by these stressors, we found no notable effects on growth, survival or hemolytic properties of the bacteria itself. Thus, we conclude that this predicted stress scenario is beneficial for the pathogen in its interaction with the host. As OA proceeds, it may force the health of the ecologically and economically important N. norvegicus to a tipping point if exposed to more short-term stressors such as the periodical events of hypoxia and Mn. This could impact lobster condition and biomass and may as well increase the risk for bacterial transmission to consumers.

Keywords
Ocean acidification, Manganese, Hypoxia, Nephrops norvegicus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Bacteriostatic response
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13348 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2014.11.025 (DOI)000349592100023 ()25553539 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-27 Created: 2014-12-27 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Sköld, H., Baden, S. P., Looström, J., Eriksson, S. P. & Hernroth, B. E. (2015). Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms. Aquatic Toxicology, 167, 31-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms
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2015 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 167, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12mgL(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn.

Keywords
Acetylcholinesterase, asterias rubens, manganese exposure, neuromuscular behaviour, ophiocomina nigra, turning assay
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14434 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2015.07.016 (DOI)000362859400004 ()26254768 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Asplund, M. E., Baden, S. P., Russ, S., Ellis, R. P., Gong, N. & Hernroth, B. E. (2014). Ocean acidification and host–pathogen interactions: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, encountering Vibrio tubiashii. Environmental Microbiology, 16(4), 1029-1039
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ocean acidification and host–pathogen interactions: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, encountering Vibrio tubiashii
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2014 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1029-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ocean acidification (OA) can shift the ecological balance between interacting organisms. In this study, we have used a model system to illustrate the interaction between a calcifying host organism, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and a common bivalve bacterial pathogen, Vibrio tubiashii, with organisms being exposed to a level of acidification projected to occur by the end of the 21st century. OA exposures of the mussels were carried out in relative long-term (4 months) and short-term (4 days) experiments. We found no effect of OA on the culturability of V. tubiashii, in broth or in seawater. OA inhibited mussel shell growth and impaired crystalline shell structures but did not appear to affect mussel immune parameters (i.e haemocyte counts and phagocytotic capacity). Despite no evident impact on host immunity or growth and virulence of the pathogen, V. tubiashii was clearly more successful in infecting mussels exposed to long-term OA compared to those maintained under ambient conditions. Moreover, OA exposed V. tubiashii increased their viability when exposed to haemocytes of OA-treated mussel. Our findings suggest that even though host organisms may have the capacity to cope with periods of OA, these conditions may alter the outcome of host–pathogen interactions, favouring the success of the latter.

National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11521 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.12307 (DOI)000333713300011 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SWE-2003-108
Note

Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013

Available from: 2013-12-23 Created: 2013-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Collin, B., Rehnstam-Holm, A.-S., Ehn Börjesson, S.-M., Mussagy, A. & Hernroth, B. (2013). Characteristics of potentially pathogenic vibrios from subtropical Mozambique compared with isolates from tropical India and boreal Sweden. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 83(2), 255-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of potentially pathogenic vibrios from subtropical Mozambique compared with isolates from tropical India and boreal Sweden
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2013 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 255-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reported outbreaks of Vibrio parahaemolyticus have increased worldwide, particularly in regions of high seafood consumption. In Mozambique, seafood constitutes an important food resource and diarrheal diseases are common among its inhabitants. Edible clams were collected in Maputo Bay during both the dry and rainy seasons, with the results showing the number of viable counts of vibrios in clams to peak during the latter. Vibrio parahaemolyticus was the predominant species identified among the isolated strains. Although only one of 109 total strains carried the tdh virulence gene, 69% of isolates showed evidence of hemolytic capacity when subjected to a functional test. Similar virulence patterns and biochemical properties were found in strains isolated from Indian and Swedish marine waters. Antibiotic resistance was, however, more pronounced in strains isolated from these latter two environments.

Keywords
Vibrio spp, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, qPCR, probe hybridization, TCBS-agar, persistence in clams, PhenePlate system, antibiotic resistance, hemolysis
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-9610 (URN)10.1111/j.1574-6941.2012.01471.x (DOI)000313252600001 ()
Available from: 2012-08-22 Created: 2012-08-22 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S. P., Hernroth, B. & Baden, S. P. (2013). Stress biology and immunology in Nephrops norvegicus. In: The ecology and biology of Nephrops norvegicus: (pp. 149-200). Amsterdam: Academic Press, 64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress biology and immunology in Nephrops norvegicus
2013 (English)In: The ecology and biology of Nephrops norvegicus, Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013, Vol. 64, p. 149-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus lives at low-light depths, in muddy substrata of high organic content where water salinities are high and fluctuations in temperature are moderate. In this environment, the lobsters are naturally exposed to a number of potential stressors, many of them as a result of the surficial breakdown of organic material in the sediment. This process (early diagenesis) creates a heterogeneous environment with temporal and spatial fluctuations in a number of compounds such as oxygen, ammonia, metals, and hydrogen sulphide. In addition to this, there are anthropogenically generated stressors, such as human-induced climate change (resulting in elevated temperature and ocean acidification), pollution and fishing. The lobsters are thus exposed to several stressors, which are strongly linked to the habitat in which the animals live. Here, the capacity of Nephrops to deal with these stressors is summarised. Eutrophication-induced hypoxia and subsequent metal remobilisation from the sediment is a well-documented effect found in some wild Nephrops populations. Compared to many other crustacean species, Nephrops is well adapted to tolerate periods of hypoxia, but prolonged or severe hypoxia, beyond their tolerance level, is common in some areas. When the oxygen concentration in the environment decreases, the bioavailability of redox-sensitive metals such as manganese increases. Manganese is an essential metal, which, taken up in excess, has a toxic effect on several internal systems such as chemosensitivity, nerve transmission and immune defence. Since sediment contains high concentrations of metals in comparison to sea water, lobsters may accumulate both essential and non-essential metals. Different metals have different target tissues, though the hepatopancreas, in general, accumulates high concentrations of most metals. The future scenario of increasing anthropogenic influences on Nephrops habitats may have adverse effects on the fitness of the animals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013
Series
Advances in marine biology, ISSN 2162-5875 ; 64
Keywords
Lobster, Global warming, Ocean acidification, Immune response, Oxidative stress
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11067 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-410466-2.00005-4 (DOI)000321561100006 ()23668590 (PubMedID)978-0-12-410466-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-05 Last updated: 2013-09-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4102-2885

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