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Kullenberg, T. & Säljö, R. (2018). Towards dialogic metaphors of learning and development: from acquisition of facts to promoting authoring. In: : . Paper presented at SIG25 Educational Theory and SIG17 Methods in Learning Research, EARLI: August 27-28..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards dialogic metaphors of learning and development: from acquisition of facts to promoting authoring
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Learning and development generally cannot be observed per se. As scholars we have to draw conclusions about such central psychological processes by making inferences from indicators of some kind. This implies that metaphors play a central role when we make such phenomena into objects of analysis. Dominant conceptions view learning as a means of achieving a pre-given endpoint understood in terms of mastery of fixed skills. In sociocultural and pragmatist perspectives such an interpretation appears as reductionistic, due to its finalizing character and the assumption of a closure of epistemological meaning-making. As an alternative, education, learning and development may be conceptualized metaphorically as increasing capacities of cultural and dialogic participation. We discuss and exemplify a number of significant learning metaphors, suggesting alternative and competing conceptions of learning and development, which contribute to dialogic growth as an element of education and everyday practices. 

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19134 (URN)
Conference
SIG25 Educational Theory and SIG17 Methods in Learning Research, EARLI: August 27-28.
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L.-E., Eklöf, A. & Kullenberg, T. (2017). Cathegorizing student, cathegorizing texts: will plagiarism detection leave blood on the tracks?. In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good : book of abstracts. Paper presented at 17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere. Tampere: University of Tampere
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cathegorizing student, cathegorizing texts: will plagiarism detection leave blood on the tracks?
2017 (English)In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good : book of abstracts, Tampere: University of Tampere , 2017Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Within research on examination cheating, a common assumption is that plagiarism in the context of examination is increasing epidemically. A uniform definition of plagiarism does not exist, but plagiarism is the category most frequently used when students at Swedish universities are notified and sanctioned for deception. Text Comparison is frequently presented as an effective technology for addressing plagiarism. Plagiarism Detection Services (PDS) are used for detecting text overlaps, particularly in higher education. While Higher Education Institutions in some countries appear to have uncritically accepted the use of text comparison technology, the reception in other countries have been ambivalent or even critical.

The present project studies consequences of the use of text comparison through teachers meaning making regarding the pedagogical task to grade students and the moral task, to report students that try to deceive. We hypothesise that teachers’ epistemological views are contingent on technology and discourses on technology. Text comparisont echnology, therefore, runs the danger of introducing consequential biases to the assessment of student performance. The material has been gathered in five focus group conversations. Focus has been introduced through the presentation of reports from a Plagiarism Detection System. A topical analysis has been performed on the transcribed conversations. From our results, we conclude that teachers’ epistemological views are contingent on technology and discourses on technology. Text comparison, therefore, runs the danger of introducing a consequential bias to the assessment of student performance leaving students open to the accusation about deception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tampere: University of Tampere, 2017
Keywords
Morality, Social interaction, Technology, Writing/Literacy
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17478 (URN)
Conference
17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere
Available from: 2017-10-15 Created: 2017-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. & Pramling, N. (2017). Children’s musical and emotional meaning making: dialogicality in instructional interaction. Mind, culture and activity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s musical and emotional meaning making: dialogicality in instructional interaction
2017 (English)In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study concerns children’s aesthetic meaning making in terms of how it is constituted musically, emotionally, and dialogically. We investigate how two 10-year-old children collaboratively engage in the task of teaching and learning to sing a song. The research questions concern what musical and emotional expressions the participants responsively construct and how these expressions are addressed, both explicitly and implicitly. Adopting a perspective grounded in Mikhail Bakhtin’s dialogue philosophy and more recent educational research in this tradition, the study explores how children’s affective reasoning is co-constructed in the process of song sharing that is also a sense-making enterprise. Interactive talk episodes, including facial displays, are transcribed, analyzed, and discussed. We demonstrate, from moment to moment, how emotive expressivity comes into play and how it refers to double dialogicality, both at the interpersonal and activity-specific level. Finally, on the basis of our findings, we discuss conflicting artistic and educational values.

National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15811 (URN)10.1080/10749039.2017.1351566 (DOI)000417627200006 ()
Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T., Eklöf, A. & Nilsson, L.-E. (2017). Independenceor interdependence?: dialogue-theoretical problems of "independent" learning. In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good: book of abstracts. Paper presented at 17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere. Tampere: University of Tampere
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Independenceor interdependence?: dialogue-theoretical problems of "independent" learning
2017 (English)In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good: book of abstracts, Tampere: University of Tampere , 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper is a theoretical paper that highlights some implications of a dialogic ontology in educational research. However, for the sake of clarity we will very succinctly setting off to describe the background which is our empirical point of departure. The aim of our current empirical study is to explore how 12 adult students in a Swedish secondary school interpret the school task of doing ‘independent’ project works, addressing the questions of how students talk and reason about their own processes and values of the activity-specific task. In brief, the method is focus group conversations (three participant groups) and the result reveals the fact that the participants appreciated their common teacher, who was considered as a very successful guide. The teacher systematically provided orders, instruction, feedback and, most importantly, planning and staging in a stepwise fashion. In doing so she paradoxically also indirectly fostered her students to be even less independent, that is, more easily adapted to the institutional requirements without bothering too much about how to manage the tasks themselves. Project work is commonly described as a self-regulated form of the task; a common mode of student work in Swedish schools (Eklöf, Nilsson & Ottosson, 2014). As Bergqvist & Säljö (2004) highlight, it could further be conceived of as a disciplining, student-centered practice that is widely used to produce self-organizing learners. Although the students are supposed to work independently, they are considerably dependent on the instructional, organizational and evaluative work of the teachers (Åberg, 2015).

 

Drawing on a sociocultural perspective on learning, as we do, the notion of individualistic independency is well-known as a problematic stance (e.g., Wertsch, 1998). In the sociocultural version of dialogism social interdependence is a dialogic premise on both the epistemological and ontological level (Linell, 2009). Wegerif (2008) describes how the functional role of difference between learners’ voices is of significance to the Bakhtin-influenced take on multi-voiced dialogue (cf. Kullenberg & Pramling, 2016; Lefstein & Snell, 2014). In such a dialogic framing the teacher is not striving to overcome these differences between, for example, the student’s and the teacher’s opinions. Such recognition holds interpersonal difference seriously and moreover address a fairly uncommon approach to the educational notion of intersubjective agreements (Matusov, 1996, 2015; Wegerif, 2011).

 

This dialogic approach stresses the issue of student agency and, thus, democratic values of teaching acts. When respecting and promoting students’ own voices a genuine interaction of consciousnesses is possible to create throughout the pedagogical dialogues (cf. Bakhtin, 2004; Matusov, 2015). Hence, what constitutes a genuine interaction is the other-orientation toward the difference of the other, recognizing the learning potentials of the gap between distinct consciousnesses. Philosophically speaking, it further suggests the conceptual need to stress alterity in other-orientation (cf. Linell, 2009).

 

Recalling our examined students, they report a situated learning that is basically grounded in a “teacher-pleasing relationship” (Matusov, 2011). While working successfully they are heavily dependent on their teacher’s agency rather than developing their own. Indeed, as sociocultural scholars we might notice that there exists a considerably confined teacher agency as well; an agency which is clearly bound to pre-determined institutional goals. This contextual condition did not facilitate the student (and teacher) opportunity to learn and experience something radically unpredicted, for example, being dialogically surprised or challenged by the genuine other. The students in our study do not neither regard themselves as truly independent nor creatively personalized. Due to a Bakhtinian approach to education, independency is an illusion anyhow, but being personalized, rather than socialized, in and through education is a central dialogue theoretical issue (Lobok, 2014).

 

In our fully elaborated paper we will dwell upon the dialogue philosophical issue on other-orientation and the role of alterity, briefly described above. In addition we intend to provide a more detailed sketch of our study and the implications for dialogic pedagogy, informed by Bakhtin and educational scholars within the field.

 

 

 

 

References

 

Åberg, M. (2015). Doing project work: the interactional organization of tasks, resources, and instructions. Diss. Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet.

Bakhtin, M. M. (2004). Dialogic origin and dialogic pedagogy of grammar: Stylistics in teaching Russian language in secondary school. Journal of Russian & East European Psychology, 42(6), 12-49.

Bergqvist, K. & Säljö, R. (2004). Learning to plan: A study of reflexivity and discipline in modern pedagogy. In J.V.D. Linden & P. Renshaw (Eds.) Dialogic learning: Shifting perspectives to learning, instruction and teaching (pp. 109-124). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Eklöf, A., Nilsson, L.-E., & Ottosson, T. (2014). Instructions, Independence and Uncertainty: student framing in self-regulated project work. European Educational Research Journal, 13(6), 646-660.

Kullenberg, T & Pramling, N. (2016). Learning and knowing songs: a study of children as music teachers. Instructional Science, 44(1), 1-23.

Lefstein, A., & Snell, J. (2014). Better than best practice: Developing teaching and learning through dialogue. London: Routledge.

Linell, P. (2009). Rethinking language, mind, and world dialogically : interactional and contextual theories of human sense-making. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publ.

Lobok, A. (2014). Education/obrazovanie as an experience of an encounter. Dialogic    Pedagogy: An International Online Journal, 2, S1-S5. DOI: 10.5195/dpj.2014.84.

Matusov, E. (1996). Intersubjectivity without agreement. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 3(1), 25-45.

Matusov, E. (2011). Authorial teaching and learning. In E. J. White & M. A. Peters (Eds.), Bakhtinian pedagogy: Opportunities and challenges for research, policy and practice in education across the globe (pp. 21–46). New York: Peter Lang.

Matusov, E. (2015). Comprehension: A dialogic authorial approach. Culture & Psychology,   21(3), 392-416.

Wegerif, R. (2008). Dialogic or dialectic? The significance of ontological assumptions in research on educational dialogue. British Educational Research Journal, 34(3), 347–361.

Wegerif, R. (2011). Towards a dialogic theory of how children learn to think. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 6, 179-190

Wertsch, J. V. (1998). Mind as action. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tampere: University of Tampere, 2017
Keywords
Cultural psychology, Learning approaches, Social aspects of learning and teaching, Teaching/instruction
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17476 (URN)
Conference
17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere
Available from: 2017-10-15 Created: 2017-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Eklöf, A., Kullenberg, T. & Nilsson, L.-E. (2017). "It is great she is really checking she wants us to pass": facilitating student project work. In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good: book of abstracts. Paper presented at 17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere. Tampere: University of Tampere
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It is great she is really checking she wants us to pass": facilitating student project work
2017 (English)In: Education in the crossroads of economy and politics: role of research in the advancement of public good: book of abstracts, Tampere: University of Tampere , 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

All students in Swedish upper secondary school have to do one mandatory project work course aimed at developing general skills such as independence, initiative, creativity and imagination. The students have to pass the course to receive their upper secondary diploma. Our study aims to investigate how students talk about the task of doing ‘independent’ project works in the diploma course.

Three focus group conversations of totaling twelve students are filmed and analyzed through topic analysis, an analytical approach based on dialogism as theoretical framework. The empirical material is analyzed from a perspective of how the design of the project course and the assessment regime influences the students work. Findings indicate that the students rely heavily on help and instruction from the teacher. They perceive of this help as a crucial asset in passing the diploma course. They state that the kind of help they receive are strongly focused towards the dividing line between pass and fail. Help is hardwired towards the scientific form and the content of their essays are treated as almost uninteresting. Support for independence therefore seems to be significantly restricted in practice. The teacher is in fact working as a facilitator guiding students towards dependence. This is accomplished through framing doing project work as doing template science.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tampere: University of Tampere, 2017
Keywords
Collaborative Learning, Conversation / Discourse analysis, Social aspects of learning and teaching, Teaching/instruction
National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17477 (URN)
Conference
17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, EARLI, Finland, Tampere
Projects
Gymnasieelevers projektarbete
Available from: 2017-10-15 Created: 2017-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. (2017). Om röstlösa röster i musikpedagogisk instrumentalism: en problematisering med utgångspunkt i Bakhtins filosofi. In: : . Paper presented at NNMPF, Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg, 14-16/3, 2017. (pp. 8-11).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Om röstlösa röster i musikpedagogisk instrumentalism: en problematisering med utgångspunkt i Bakhtins filosofi
2017 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Detta paper är av dialogfilosofiskt slag. Med intentionen att endast föra en filosofisk musikpedagogisk diskussion redovisas därför inte det empiriska underlaget från det artikelprojekt som ligger till grund för bidraget (Kullenberg & Pramling, in press). Med avstamp i ett urval av den musikpedagogiska forskning som gjorts kring problematiken med den instrumentella utbildningsdiskursen, argumenterar jag i liknande anda. Mer precist förs resonemanget med stöd i internationell musikpedagogisk forskning som bygger på Mikhail Bakhtins anti-instrumentella förståelse av såväl mellanmänsklig kommunikation som estetiska uttryckssätt.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17479 (URN)
Conference
NNMPF, Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg, 14-16/3, 2017.
Available from: 2017-10-15 Created: 2017-10-15 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. (2016). Instrumentellt och existentiellt lärande i relationell belysning: . In: : . Paper presented at konferens och nätverksträff: Nordisk Relationell Pedagogik (NORP). 17-18 mars, 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instrumentellt och existentiellt lärande i relationell belysning:
2016 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15803 (URN)
Conference
konferens och nätverksträff: Nordisk Relationell Pedagogik (NORP). 17-18 mars, 2016.
Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. & Pramling, N. (2016). Learning and knowing songs: a study of children as music teachers. Instructional science, 44(1), 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning and knowing songs: a study of children as music teachers
2016 (English)In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we analyze how learners constitute what it means to learn and know a song. This is investigated in the context of four 9- to 10-year-old children in dyads teaching each other to sing a song of their own choosing. How the children take on this task is studied in terms of how they dialogically co-construct pedagogical and musical values throughout the collaborative tasks. The empirical data consist of video observations of the children engaged in dyads. Informed by a sociocultural perspective, with an emphasis on mediational means, scaffolding and appropriation, the study seeks to examine how young people’s instructional methods are facilitated and constrained by communicative resources of different kinds. The empirical data is analyzed as interactively unfolding activity. The study shows that the children make a distinction between learning and knowing a song, in terms of tool use. In teaching, learning is communicated as supported by mediational means in the form of external visualization tools, while knowing the song, from the participants’ point of view means to be able to sing the song without any such mediational means. From a sociocultural theoretical perspective, this difference is conceptualized as the gradual learning process of moving from a materialized practice, based on external artifacts, to an embodied practice, that is, a change in mediational means rather than developing musical knowing without tools.

Keywords
Instruction teaching, learning, singing, children, sociocultural perspective
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15808 (URN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. (2016). Ontologiskt lärande i klassrummet: ett dialogiskt alternativ till instrumentell kommunikation?. In: : . Paper presented at Dialogkonferensen 2016, Pedagogisk forskning i Skåne, Lunds universitet, 22/8..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ontologiskt lärande i klassrummet: ett dialogiskt alternativ till instrumentell kommunikation?
2016 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15805 (URN)
Conference
Dialogkonferensen 2016, Pedagogisk forskning i Skåne, Lunds universitet, 22/8.
Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, T. & Lindgren, M. (2016). “You MAY take the note home an’… well practise just that”: children’s interaction in contextualizing music teaching. Nordic Research in Music Education Yearbook Vol. 16, 16, 101-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“You MAY take the note home an’… well practise just that”: children’s interaction in contextualizing music teaching
2016 (English)In: Nordic Research in Music Education Yearbook Vol. 16, ISSN 0333-3760, Vol. 16, p. 101-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article takes “music as symbol” as its analytical point of departure, described by Jorgensen (2003). In doing so, the authors stress the role of symbolic functioning in music, focusing at how children understand and make sense of music in talk and practice. The aim of this text is to theoretically explore the nature of dialogical music education. In order to do so we reuse empirical data from a previous study. These data contain four children’s instructional interaction in a teaching activity, that is, the task to teach each other singing songs. Further, we examine our data through the lenses of two theoretical concepts, based on communication theory: double dialogicality and communicative formality. Our interactional data point at the contextual nature of musical sense making. The children’s communication was not only merely interpersonal in nature. Rather, it also clearly referred to an embedded cultural context that existed beyond the local interactional context. This article illustrates how such kind of music-educational sense making is socially constructed in action.

 

Keywords
Children, singing, context, teaching, interaction, music as symbol, double dialogicality
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14864 (URN)10.13140/RG.2.1.1583.1126 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-09-29 Created: 2015-09-29 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0349-9682

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