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Galway, L. P., Beery, T., Jones-Casey, K. & Tasala, K. (2019). Mapping the solastalgia literature: a scoping review study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(15)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping the solastalgia literature: a scoping review study
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Solastalgia is a relatively new concept for understanding the links between human and ecosystem health, specifically, the cumulative impacts of climatic and environmental change on mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Given the speed and scale of climate change alongside biodiversity loss, pollution, deforestation, unbridled resource extraction, and other environmental challenges, more and more people will experience solastalgia. This study reviewed 15 years of scholarly literature on solastalgia using a scoping review process. Our goal was to advance conceptual clarity, synthesize the literature, and identify priorities for future research. Four specific questions guided the review process: (1) How is solastalgia conceptualized and applied in the literature?; (2) How is solastalgia experienced and measured in the literature?; (3) How is 'place' understood in the solastalgia literature?; and (4) Does the current body of literature on solastalgia engage with Indigenous worldviews and experiences? Overall, we find there is a need for additional research employing diverse methodologies, across a greater diversity of people and places, and conducted in collaboration with affected populations and potential knowledge, alongside greater attention to the practical implications and applications of solastalgia research. We also call for continued efforts to advance conceptual clarity and theoretical foundations. Key outcomes of this study include our use of the landscape construct in relation to solastalgia and a call to better understand Indigenous peoples' lived experiences of landscape transformation and degradation in the context of historical traumas.

Keywords
climate change, emotional health, environmental change, landscape, mental health, place, solastalgia
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-19786 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16152662 (DOI)000482128400031 ()31349659 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Beery, T., Raymond, C. M., Kyttä, M., Olafsson, A. S., Plieninger, T., Sandberg, M., . . . Jönsson, K. I. (2017). Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning. Ambio, 46(7), 717-730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning
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2017 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 717-730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concern for a diminished human experience of nature and subsequent decreased human well-being is addressed via a consideration of green infrastructure's potential to facilitate unplanned or incidental nature experience. Incidental nature experience is conceptualized and illustrated in order to consider this seldom addressed aspect of human interaction with nature in green infrastructure planning. Special attention has been paid to the ability of incidental nature experience to redirect attention from a primary activity toward an unplanned focus (in this case, nature phenomena). The value of such experience for human well-being is considered. The role of green infrastructure to provide the opportunity for incidental nature experience may serve as a nudge or guide toward meaningful interaction. These ideas are explored using examples of green infrastructure design in two Nordic municipalities: Kristianstad, Sweden, and Copenhagen, Denmark. The outcome of the case study analysis coupled with the review of literature is a set of sample recommendations for how green infrastructure can be designed to support a range of incidental nature experiences with the potential to support human well-being.

Keywords
Extinction of experience, Human well-being, Incidental nature experience, Intentional nature experience, Nudging, Redirection of attention
National Category
Natural Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16692 (URN)10.1007/s13280-017-0920-z (DOI)000411967700001 ()28444643 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-11-15Bibliographically approved
Beery, T. H. & Jönsson, K. I. (2017). Outdoor recreation and place attachment: exploring the potential of outdoor recreation within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, 17, 54-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor recreation and place attachment: exploring the potential of outdoor recreation within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve
2017 (English)In: Journal of Outdoor Recreation, ISSN 2213-0780, E-ISSN 2213-0799, Vol. 17, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates outdoor recreation participation within a multifunctional landscape, a UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve. The reserve, the Kristianstad Vattenrike located in southern Sweden, has made a deliberate effort to make the experience of biodiversity possible for residents and visitors. Recreation is a keypart of the biodiversity conservation effort in the area, represented by the infrastructure of the Kristianstad Vattenrike's 21 visitor sites. Given the biosphere reserve context, this study investigates the question of whether there is a relationship between outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Survey data was collected using concurrent application of multiple sampling strategies including both probability and purposive sampling of local adult residents of the biosphere area. Quantitative analysis showed a significant positive relationship between the level of outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Qualitative data supported this relationship with more details about place attachment within the studied area. The study confirms a relationship between place attachment and outdoor recreation and provides insight into how the biosphere reserve context supports this relationship. The results of this study show that significant biodiversity management in close conjunction with outdoor recreational opportunity can be achieved and provides opportunities for human engagement and experience of biodiversity.

Management Implications: This research can help managers design recreational settings that support biodiversity conservation goals. Our research found that:

• A leading motivation for outdoor recreation participation is nature experience and this motivation can be used by managers to highlight a biodiversity conservation interpretive message in the design of outdoor recreation infrastructure.

• Providing proximate access to nature based outdoor recreation, to support deliberate and direct experience of biodiversity, is an important component of engaging the public in biodiversity conservation.

• Recreation proximity alone will not create public engagement in biodiversity conservation. However,proximity as a part of a deliberate institutional design including biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and logistic support for research and monitoring may be critical for public engagement.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Kristianstad Vattenrike, outdoor education, place attachment, biosphere reserves
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16522 (URN)10.1016/j.jort.2017.01.002 (DOI)000400277500007 ()
Available from: 2017-02-04 Created: 2017-02-04 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Beery, T. (2016). Childhood collecting in nature: quality experience in important places. In: : . Paper presented at International Association for People Environment Studies, June 2016, Lund, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood collecting in nature: quality experience in important places
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is growing concern for both the decline of direct experience people have with nature, and the quality of that experience. This diminished experience has negative consequences for public awareness and concern for biodiversity and ecosystem health (Miller, 2005). At the same time, a diminished experience of nature appears to have a substantial negative impact on child development (Kahn & Friedman, 1995; Kahn, 2002; Matteo, Barthel, & Lars, 2014; Pyle, 1993; Thomashow, 2002). These concerns are heightened in the urban context where increased urbanization shows a relationship with a reduction in biodiversity and ecosystem health (MA, 2005; Sala et al., 2000). Additional concern comes from studies showing decreasing ecological knowledge among growing urban populations (McDaniel & Alley, 2005; McKinney, 2002). In an attempt to address these concerns and contribute toward a better understanding of the importance of childhood experience of nature, this study investigates one specific example, collecting in nature. Studies show that childhood collecting in nature (the gathering of rocks, shells, feathers, etc. as part of play and free exploration) is a widespread phenomenon (Lekies & Beery, 2013), and yet, very little is understood about this behavior. This study explored the details of childhood collecting in nature with an emphasis on the places of this experience. Participants consisted of a random sample of undergraduate students at a Swedish university (N = 380) participating in a survey focused upon early life outdoor experiences. Responses included multiple choice and Likert scale items, along with data from open-ended questions. In addition, participants were invited to discuss their experience of childhood collecting in greater detail via a semi-structured interview. Fourteen interviews were conducted as follow-up to the survey. Data review considered descriptive statistics, correlations, and regression analysis triangulated with the qualitative data from the open-ended responses and interviews. Results highlight the importance of specific places in the childhood experience of nature, the importance of nearby nature, and further, provide preliminary support for a model for environmental concern (Wolf-Watz, 2015). Ultimately, the study illuminates the idea of childhood development as a cultural ecosystem service and provides implications for nature-based solutions, such as green infrastructure, to support childhood nature experience.

Keywords
Ecosystem services
National Category
Natural Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15825 (URN)
Conference
International Association for People Environment Studies, June 2016, Lund, Sweden
Available from: 2016-08-29 Created: 2016-08-29 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Wamsler, C., Niven, L., Beery, T. H., Bramryd, T., Ekelund, N., Jönsson, K. I., . . . Stålhammar, S. (2016). Operationalizing ecosystem-based adaptation: harnessing ecosystem services to buffer communities against climate change. Ecology & society, 21(1), Article ID 31.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operationalizing ecosystem-based adaptation: harnessing ecosystem services to buffer communities against climate change
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2016 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecosystem-based approaches for climate change adaptation are promoted at international, national, and local levels by both scholars and practitioners. However, local planning practices that support these approaches are scattered, and measures are neither systematically implemented nor comprehensively reviewed. Against this background, this paper advances the operationalization of ecosystem-based adaptation by improving our knowledge of how ecosystem-based approaches can be considered in local planning (operational governance level). We review current research on ecosystem services in urban areas and examine four Swedish coastal municipalities to identify the key characteristics of both implemented and planned measures that support ecosystem-based adaptation. The results show that many of the measures that have been implemented focus on biodiversity rather than climate change adaptation, which is an important factor in only around half of all measures. Furthermore, existing measures are limited in their focus regarding the ecological structures and the ecosystem services they support, and the hazards and risk factors they address. We conclude that a more comprehensive approach to sustainable ecosystem-based adaptation planning and its systematic mainstreaming is required. Our framework for the analysis of ecosystem-based adaptation measures proved to be useful in identifying how ecosystem-related matters are addressed in current practice and strategic planning, and in providing knowledge on how ecosystem-based adaptation can further be considered in urban planning practice. Such a systematic analysis framework can reveal the ecological structures, related ecosystem services, and risk-reducing approaches that are missing and why. This informs the discussion about why specific measures are not considered and provides pathways for alternate measures/designs, related operations, and policy processes at different scales that can foster sustainable adaptation and transformation in municipal governance and planning.

Keywords
climate change adaptation, ecosystem management, ecosystem services, green infrastructure, municipal planning, nature-based solutions, renaturing cities, risk reduction, spatial planning, sustainability transitions, urban planning, urban resilience, urban transformation
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15434 (URN)10.5751/ES-08266-210131 (DOI)000373935100035 ()
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 13/143Region Skåne, M066/2013Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-901
Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Beery, T., Stålhammar, S., Jönsson, I., Wamsler, C., Bramryd, T., Brink, E., . . . Schubert, P. (2016). Perceptions of the ecosystem services concept: opportunities and challenges in the Swedish municipal context. Ecosystem Services, 17, 123-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of the ecosystem services concept: opportunities and challenges in the Swedish municipal context
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2016 (English)In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 17, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A current focus of ecosystem services (ES) implementation is on the municipal level of government where international and national legislation and policies have to be translated into practice. Given this focus, an understanding of perceptions within municipalities of the ES concept is crucial to support the implementation process. Against this background, this paper examines the perceptions of Swedish municipal stakeholders for the ES concept. A 2013 Swedish federal mandate that states that the values of ecosystem services should be considered in relevant decision-making processes, provides a timely context. Current perceptions, preconditions and awareness are explored via interviews and analyses. The results show that the views on the ecosystem services concept and its usefulness are generally very positive. Conceptual knowledge use is perceived as important as is the recognition of monetary valuation of ES. However, clarification of the distinction between implicit and explicit use of the concept by stakeholders is needed. Finally, results indicate that a deeper understanding of monetary valuation of ecosystem services by municipal staff members is connected with a more critical view on monetary valuation. It is concluded that detailed and clear definitions and guidelines are needed in order to support the process of implementing ES in municipalities.

Keywords
Ecosystem services, perceptions, municipalities
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15828 (URN)
Projects
ECOSIMP
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 13/143
Available from: 2016-08-29 Created: 2016-08-29 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Palo, T. R., Lagercrantz, K., Bramryd, T., Johansson, M., Beery, T., Jönsson, K. I., . . . Ekelund, N. (2016). Priority areas in municipality planning: ecosystemservices, environmental impact assessments and research areas. One Ecosystem, 1, Article ID e9869.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Priority areas in municipality planning: ecosystemservices, environmental impact assessments and research areas
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2016 (English)In: One Ecosystem, ISSN 2367-8194, Vol. 1, article id e9869Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several pressing issues face municipal planners including increased land use and climate change. Managing these issues requires a balance between different actions to accommodate citizen’s demands of ecosystem services (ES) and development projects. The implementation of ES as a new tool for assessments needs to be contrasted by research considering existing tools such as Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). ES has been introduced as a policy tool at the governmental level but implementation at the local and regional scale is still needed; municipalities could benefit from collaboration with the research community for state of the art methods. One obstacle for implementation of ES is that it is not always easy for laymen to understand and additionally, the ES concept may be weakly supported by science. The municipalities realize that a society on its way towards sustainability takes advantage of new knowledge and that interactions with research will put them in the forefront of new scientific questions. The municipalities ask for research that takes a citizen perspective and research that prioritizes questions other than pure environmental considerations. Priorities in municipality planning are based on local conditions and rely on EIA. Many ecological indicators are already covered in EIA and this is reflected in Swedish Comprehensive Plans (SCP) documents, yet need further analysis is needed to be a part of ES. The SCPs present concepts at a policy level and rarely provide a more detailed plan of action compatible with the ES approach.

New information: We found that the use of ES concepts in Swedish Comprehensive Plans and in EIA is still not common and in need of further support from research and in practice. The EIA is decisive for comprehensive planning documents in the Swedish municipalities and follows standard format over time and between municipalities. ES is focused on human needs while the EIA describes place based assessments on environmental impact rather than feedback to the society by the intervention. Municipalities of south Sweden ask for research support in many different areas, for instance how to set up proper organization for implementation of ES and environmental issues, but priorities are based on their local conditions. The results shows that collaboration between stakeholders and researchers is needed which can create incentives, so that the decisions made by individuals, communities, corporations, and governments may be able to promote widely shared values compatible with ES. Researchers and municipalities who work on an operational level face many challenges in promoting greater use of the ES approach, with some of them yet to be defined. We conclude that implementation of ES could draw from lessons learned in the use of EIA. Further, it is presented that ES has the potential for greater public and stakeholder feedback into decisions as compared to EIA.

Keywords
Ecosystem services, strategic planning, municipalities, environmental impact assessment
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16278 (URN)10.3897/oneeco.1.e9869 (DOI)
Projects
ECOSIMP
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 13/143
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Beery, T. & Jönsson, K. I. (2015). Betydelsen av att uppleva biologisk mångfald. Biodiverse, 20(2), 16-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betydelsen av att uppleva biologisk mångfald
2015 (Swedish)In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Centrum för biologisk mångfald, 2015
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14849 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-29 Created: 2015-09-29 Last updated: 2015-10-05Bibliographically approved
Ernst, J., Blood, N. & Beery, T. (2015). Environmental action and student environmental leaders: exploring the influence of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility. Environmental Education Research, 23(2), 149-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental action and student environmental leaders: exploring the influence of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility
2015 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 149-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Student Climate and Conservation Congress (SC3) is a joint educational effort between the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Green Schools Alliance that aims to develop the next generation of conservation leaders through fostering action competence in youth. Data from SC3 participants was used to investigate four predictors of adult environmental behavior (environmental attitudes, locus of control, sense of personal responsibility, intention) to explore their predictability of environmental action and intention toward future involvement in environmental action in student environmental leaders. Of the four variables explored, pre-program levels of environmental attitudes was a significant predictor of environmental action. Additionally, changes in levels of environmental attitudes significantly predicted environmental action, with an increase in environmental attitudes being associated with a decrease in environmental action. Pre-program levels of environmental attitudes and sense of personal responsibility, and an interaction between the two, potentially were predictors of intention toward future involvement in environmental action. Changes in pre- and post-program levels of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility did not significantly predict intention toward future involvement in environmental action, nor did environmental action. Implications for programming and research, in light of the study’s limitations, are discussed.

Keywords
Environmental attitudes, locus of control, sense of personal responsibility, intention toward action, environmental action
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14855 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2015.1068278 (DOI)000393209400001 ()
Available from: 2015-09-29 Created: 2015-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-07Bibliographically approved
Beery, T., Jönsson, K. I. & Elmberg, J. (2015). From environmental connectedness to sustainable futures: topophilia and human affiliation with nature. In: European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association Annual Conference, University of Helsinki, March 29-April 1, 2015: . Paper presented at European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association Annual Conference, University of Helsinki, March 29-April 1, 2015 (pp. 57-58).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From environmental connectedness to sustainable futures: topophilia and human affiliation with nature
2015 (English)In: European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association Annual Conference, University of Helsinki, March 29-April 1, 2015, 2015, p. 57-58Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study is to explore the co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature, and its potential to support sustainable development at the local level. In particular, we analyse the Topophilia Hypothesis, an expansion of the Biophilia Hypothesis which includes also non-living elements in the environment. Methods: The study represents a multidisciplinary conceptual analysis of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. Results and Conclusions: The Biophilia Hypothesis has been one of the most important theories of human connectedness with nature, suggesting a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of Biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. It also puts more emphasis on affiliation processes with the local environment. We propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable development at the local level, and ultimately at the global level. Tendencies of local affiliation may also have implications for multifunctional landscape management, an important area within sustainability research, and we provide some examples of successful landscape management with a strong component of local engagement. Since human affiliation with nonhuman nature is considered an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes, the Topophilia Hypothesis may provide a fruitful ground for a discourse within which scholars from many scientific fields, including human evolution and humanistic geography, can participate.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16074 (URN)
Conference
European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association Annual Conference, University of Helsinki, March 29-April 1, 2015
Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2016-09-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2774-3731

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