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Renvert, S., Widén, C. & Persson, R. G. (2017). Cytokine and microbial profiles in relation to the clinical outcome following treatment of peri-implantitis. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 28(9), 1127-1132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytokine and microbial profiles in relation to the clinical outcome following treatment of peri-implantitis
2017 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1127-1132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To study whether cytokine levels and bacterial counts in p atients with peri-implantitis reflect clinical treatment outcome following non-surgical management.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luminex magnet bead technology and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization were used to assess treatment outcome after treatment at the implant with the most severe peri-implantitis in 41 participants.

RESULTS: Study group mean age was 40.3 years (SD ± 9.9). Stable treatment outcome after 6 months (no further bone loss, probing pocket depth decrease ≥0.5 mm, no bleeding/suppuration) was identified in 9 of 41 (22%) participants. Peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) levels were also lower for Il-1β (P < 0.01), and with trends of lower cytokine levels in PICF for TNF-α (P = 0.071), PDGFBB (P = 0.071), as well as for VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) (P = 0.071), and bacterial counts for Actinomyces israelii, Aggregatibacter actonomycetemcomitans (Y4), Campylobacter gracilis, Echerichia coli, Fusobacterium periodonticum, Leptotrichia buccalis, Parvimonas micra, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Tannerella forsythia. Increasing levels of IL-1 β and S. aureus (r(2)  = 0.856) were found only at implants with non-stable outcome. A reduction of PICF levels for selected cytokines and bacteria studied had a sensitivity of 0.77, and a specificity of 0.80 against the clinical outcome as gold standard. Data analysis failed to differences in treatments (PerioFlow(®) versus YAG: ER laser) for changes in the expression of cytokines and bacteria studied.

CONCLUSIONS: At 6 months, clinically stable treatment outcome of peri-implantitis is associated lower levels of putative pathogens total bacterial load with ≥30% reduction of IL1-β, L-6, and VEGF levels in PICF.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15697 (URN)10.1111/clr.12927 (DOI)000409448600020 ()27422156 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-14 Created: 2016-08-14 Last updated: 2017-10-05Bibliographically approved
Tonetti, M. S., Bottenberg, P., Conrads, G., Eickholz, P., Heasman, P., Huysmans, M.-C., . . . Paris, S. (2017). Dental caries and periodontal diseases in the ageing population: call to action to protect and enhance oral health and well-being as an essential component of healthy ageing - consensus report of group 4 of the joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal diseases.. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 44(Suppl. 18), S135-S144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental caries and periodontal diseases in the ageing population: call to action to protect and enhance oral health and well-being as an essential component of healthy ageing - consensus report of group 4 of the joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal diseases.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no Suppl. 18, p. S135-S144Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Over the last two decades, progress in prevention and treatment of caries and periodontal diseases has been translated to better oral health and improved tooth retention in the adult population. The ageing population and the increasing expectations of good oral health-related quality of life in older age pose formidable challenges to clinical care and healthcare systems.

AIMS: The objective of this workshop was to critically review scientific evidence and develop specific recommendations to: (i) prevent tooth loss and retain oral function through prevention and treatment of caries and periodontal diseases later in life and (ii) increase awareness of the health benefits of oral health as an essential component of healthy ageing.

METHODS: Discussions were initiated by three systematic reviews covering aspects of epidemiology of caries and periodontal diseases in elders, the impact of senescence on caries and periodontal diseases and the effectiveness of interventions. Recommendations were developed based on evidence from the systematic reviews and expert opinion.

RESULTS: Key messages included: (i) the ageing population, trends in risk factors and improved tooth retention point towards an expected increase in the total burden of disease posed by caries and periodontal diseases in the older population; (ii) specific surveillance is required to monitor changes in oral health in the older population; (iii) senescence impacts oral health including periodontitis and possibly caries susceptibility; (iv) evidence indicates that caries and periodontal diseases can be prevented and treated also in older adults; (v) oral health and functional tooth retention later in life provides benefits both in terms of oral and general quality of life and in terms of preventing physical decline and dependency by fostering a healthy diet; (vi) oral healthcare professionals and individuals should not base decisions impacting tooth retention on chronological age but on level of dependency, life expectancy, frailty, comfort and quality of life; and (vii) health policy should remove barriers to oral health care for vulnerable elders.

CONCLUSIONS: Consensus was reached on specific actionable priorities for public health officials, oral healthcare professionals, educators and workforce planners, caregivers and relatives as well as for the public and ageing patients. Some priorities have major implications for policymakers as health systems need to adapt to the challenge by systemwide changes to enable (promote) tooth retention later in life and management of deteriorating oral health in increasingly dependent elders.

Keywords
ageing, dental caries, dependency, epidemiology, frailty, gerodontology, masticatory dysfunction, nutrition, older people, periodontal diseases, periodontitis, public health, root caries, senescence, tooth loss
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17578 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12681 (DOI)000418237200011 ()28266112 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Erovic Ademovski, S., Mårtensson, C., Persson, R. G. & Renvert, S. (2017). The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis: a randomized clinical trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 44(10), 1010-1019
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis: a randomized clinical trial
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1010-1019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16610 (URN)000417407300007 ()28727160 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Isehed, C., Holmlund, A., Renvert, S., Svenson, B., Johansson, I. & Lundberg, P. (2016). Effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative on the clinical and microbiological outcomes following surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 43(10), 863-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative on the clinical and microbiological outcomes following surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: a randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 863-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This randomized clinical trial aimed at comparing radiological, clinical and microbial effects of surgical treatment of peri-implantitis alone or in combination with enamel matrix derivative (EMD).

METHODS: Twenty-six subjects were treated with open flap debridement and decontamination of the implant surfaces with gauze and saline preceding adjunctive EMD or no EMD. Bone level (BL) change was primary outcome and secondary outcomes were changes in pocket depth (PD), plaque, pus, bleeding and the microbiota of the peri-implant biofilm analyzed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray over a time period of 12 months.

RESULTS: In multivariate modelling, increased marginal BL at implant site was significantly associated with EMD, the number of osseous walls in the peri-implant bone defect and a Gram+/aerobic microbial flora, whereas reduced BL was associated with a Gram-/anaerobic microbial flora and presence of bleeding and pus, with a cross-validated predictive capacity (Q(2) ) of 36.4%. Similar, but statistically non-significant, trends were seen for BL, PD, plaque, pus and bleeding in univariate analysis.

CONCLUSION: Adjunctive EMD to surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was associated with prevalence of Gram+/aerobic bacteria during the follow-up period and increased marginal BL 12 months after treatment.

Keywords
EMD treatment, bone level, microbiota, peri-implantitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15964 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12583 (DOI)000388357000008 ()27418458 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Renvert, S. (2016). Halitosis (Dålig andedräkt). Göteborg: Internmedicin
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Halitosis (Dålig andedräkt)
2016 (Swedish)Other (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, pages
Göteborg: Internmedicin, 2016. p. 1
Keywords
Halitosis, dålig andedräkt
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15353 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2016-03-30Bibliographically approved
Widén, C., Critén, S., Renvert, S. & Persson, R. G. (2016). Measuring inflammatory markers in saliva in polyphenols research. In: Finn, CE & Mezzetti, B (Ed.), 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC). Paper presented at 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture - Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC) / 2nd International Berry Fruit Symposium - Interactions! Local and Global Berry Research and Innovation, AUG 17-22, 2014, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA (pp. 201-206).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring inflammatory markers in saliva in polyphenols research
2016 (English)In: 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC) / [ed] Finn, CE & Mezzetti, B, 2016, p. 201-206Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is currently an interest in the possible anti-inflammatory effects of intake of fruits and berries. The aim of this study was to determine whether the twice daily administration of a berry beverage rich in polyphenols had effects on salivary levels of a selected group of pro-inflammatory cytokines for one week in a pre-and post-study design. Levels of selected cytokines were compared in whole saliva and saliva obtained using commercially available collection devices (Salivette (R) Cotton and Salivette (R) Synthetic rolls). Twenty healthy subjects drank 200 mL of a berry beverage consisting of equal parts of bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) diluted with 50% water. Levels of cytokines, IL-1 beta, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-alpha were assessed. Levels of cytokines differed between sources of collection but were highest in whole saliva. The use of cotton or synthetic rolls does not seem to be useful as a method for saliva collection and cytokine analysis. There was no significant change in the levels of selected cytokines at baseline and after intake of the berry beverage in whole stimulated saliva. There was a large inter-individual variation in cytokine levels.

Series
Acta Horticulturae, ISSN 0567-7572 ; 117
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16517 (URN)10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1117.32 (DOI)000391239600032 ()978-94-62611-13-9 (ISBN)
Conference
29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture - Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC) / 2nd International Berry Fruit Symposium - Interactions! Local and Global Berry Research and Innovation, AUG 17-22, 2014, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2017-11-02Bibliographically approved
Schwarz, F., Becker, K., Bastendorf, K.-D., Cardaropoli, D., Chatfield, C., Dunn, I., . . . Renvert, S. (2016). Recommendations on the clinical application of air polishing for the management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Quintessence International, 47(4), 293-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recommendations on the clinical application of air polishing for the management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis
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2016 (English)In: Quintessence International, ISSN 0033-6572, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 293-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Air polishing was introduced as an alternative approach for the supra- and submucosal biofilm management at dental implants. An international expert meeting involving competent clinicians and researchers took place during the EUROPERIO 8 conference in London, UK, on 4 June 2015. Prior to this meeting a comprehensive systematic review dealing with the efficacy of air polishing in the treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was prepared and served as a basis for the group discussions. This paper summarizes the consensus statements and practical recommendations on the clinical application of air polishing for the management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

Keywords
Air polishing, peri-implantitis, peri-implant mucositis, therapy
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16094 (URN)10.3290/j.qi.a35132 (DOI)000377600600004 ()26574612 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-28 Created: 2016-09-28 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Jepsen, K., Jepsen, S., Laine, M., Anssari Moin, D., Pilloni, A., Zeza, B., . . . Renvert, S. (2016). Reconstruction of peri-implant osseous defects: a multicenter randomized trial. Journal of Dental Research, 95(1), 58-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconstruction of peri-implant osseous defects: a multicenter randomized trial
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a paucity of data for the effectiveness of reconstructive procedures in the treatment of peri-implantitis. The objective of this study was to compare reconstruction of peri-implant osseous defects with open flap debridement (OFD) plus porous titanium granules (PTGs) compared with OFD alone. Sixty-three patients (36 female, 27 male; mean age 58.4 y [SD 12.3]), contributing one circumferential peri-implant intraosseous defect, were included in a multinational, multicenter randomized trial using a parallel-group design. After OFD and surface decontamination using titanium brushes and hydrogen peroxide, 33 defects received PTGs. The implants were not submerged. All patients received adjunctive perioperative systemic antibiotics. The primary outcome variable (defect fill) was assessed on digitalized radiographs. Clinical measurements of probing depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BoP), suppuration, and plaque were taken by blinded examiners. After 12 mo, the test group (OFD plus PTG) showed a mean radiographic defect fill (mesial/distal) of 3.6/3.6 mm compared with 1.1/1.0 in the control group (OFD). Differences were statistically significant in favor of the test group (P < 0.0001). The OFD plus PTG group showed a mean reduction in PPD of 2.8 mm compared with 2.6 mm in the OFD group. BoP was reduced from 89.4% to 33.3% and from 85.8% to 40.4% for the test and control groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in complete resolution of peri-implantitis (PPD ≤4 mm and no BoP at six implant sites and no further bone loss), because this finding was accomplished at 30% of implants in the test group and 23% of implants in the control group. Reconstructive surgery using PTGs resulted in significantly enhanced radiographic defect fill compared with OFD. However, limitations in the lack of ability to discern biomaterial from osseous tissue could not be verified to determine new bone formation. Similar improvements according to clinical measures were obtained after both surgical treatment modalities (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02406001).

Keywords
Bone regeneration, debridement, dental/oral implants, peri-implantitis, surgical therapy, titanium granules
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15010 (URN)10.1177/0022034515610056 (DOI)000367103000009 ()26450511 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Widén, C., Holmer, H., Coleman, M., Tudor, M., Ohlsson, O., Sättlin, S., . . . Persson, G. R. (2016). Systemic inflammatory impact of periodontitis on acute coronary syndrome. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 43(9), 713-719
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systemic inflammatory impact of periodontitis on acute coronary syndrome
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 713-719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: A causative relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and periodontitis has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to assess differences in levels of serum cytokines between individuals with or without ACS or periodontal comorbidity.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a case-control study, individuals with ACS (78 individuals, 10.3% females) and matching healthy controls (78 individuals, 28.2% females) were included. Medical and dental examinations were performed to diagnose ACS and periodontitis. Serum levels of cytokines were assessed using Luminex technology.

RESULTS: A diagnosis of periodontitis in the ACS and control group was diagnosed in 52.6% and 12.8% of the individuals, respectively. The unadjusted odds-ratio that individuals with ACS also had periodontitis was 7.5 (95% CI: 3.4, 16.8, p<0.001). Independent of periodontal conditions, individuals with ACS had significantly higher serum levels of IL8 (mean: 44.3 and 40.0 pg/ml) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (mean: 82.3 and 55.3 pg/ml) than control individuals. A diagnosis of periodontitis made no difference in serum cytokine expressions.

CONCLUSION: Elevated serum levels of VEGF were associated with ACS. Serum cytokine expression in individuals with ACS is unrelated to periodontal conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
VEGF; cardiovascular disease; cytokines; hs-CRP; human; oral disease; serum
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-15324 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12540 (DOI)000381034300001 ()26935585 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Erovic Ademovski, S., Lingström, P. & Renvert, S. (2016). The effect of different mouth rinse products on intra-oral halitosis. International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 14(2), 117-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of different mouth rinse products on intra-oral halitosis
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To evaluate the effect of different mouth rinses 12 h after rinsing on genuine intra-oral halitosis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four adults with halitosis were included in a double-blind, crossover, randomized clinical trial. Halitosis was evaluated 12 h after rinsing with placebo and five mouth rinse products containing zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate; zinc lactate, chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride; zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate with reduced amounts of mint and menthol; zinc chloride and essential oil; and chlorine dioxide using the organoleptic method and a gas chromatograph. Test periods were separated by 1 week.

RESULTS: Hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and the organoleptic scores (OLS) were significantly reduced 12 h following rinsing with all substances compared to placebo (P < 0.05). H2 S was more effectively reduced after rinsing with zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate and zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate with reduced amounts of mint and menthol compared to rinsing with zinc chloride and essential oil (P < 0.05), and significantly lower values of MM were obtained after rinsing with zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate compared to zinc lactate, chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (P < 0.05). The percentage effectively treated individuals (H2 S (<112 ppb), MM (<26 ppb) and OLS score <2) varied from 58% percentage (zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate) to 26% (zinc chloride and essential oil).

CONCLUSION: All treatments resulted in reduction in halitosis 12 h after rinsing compared to placebo. H2 S and MM were most effectively reduced by zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate.

Keywords
bad breath, halitosis, hydrogen sulphide, mouth rinses, volatile sulphur compounds
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13996 (URN)10.1111/idh.12148 (DOI)000374351500006 ()26031397 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0992-2362

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