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Nilsson, B. (2017). Autonomy and ownership – digital music tools enhance autonomy and musical creativity for children in need of special support. In: Absctracts: senior research: NNMPF 2017: the 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017. Paper presented at The 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017 (pp. 14).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomy and ownership – digital music tools enhance autonomy and musical creativity for children in need of special support
2017 (English)In: Absctracts: senior research: NNMPF 2017: the 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017, 2017, p. 14-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This presentation highlights results from an action research project in a Swedish primary school. The aim of the project is to investigate digitally-based musical settings with young children in need of special support. Various digital-based music instruments were used to facilitate performing, creating and learning music, alone or in small groups.

The theoretical background of the project is found in sociocultural educational theories, health theories and musicology. To engage in musicking is to take part in any kind of musical event such as performing, listening, practicing or providing material for musical activities. The Zone of Proximal Development describes how the learner with guidance can improve his or her social interaction with more competent peers. Physical and psychological tools mediate the world to individuals engaged in practical activities such as musicking.

The research method is inspired by ethnographical methods and performed in collaboration between a music educator and the researcher. Data was collected mainly through participant observations, field notes, audio and video recordings. Preliminary results of the study demonstrate that even very young children quickly learn how to use digitally-based instruments for playing and creating music. Open-ended apps seemed to catch the participants’ interest, whereas in some cases they soon lost interest in ready-made apps.

Results furthermore imply that a musical setting might be regarded as a combination of cultural, musical, technical, physical, psychological and personal resources. The digitally-based instruments were found in many cases to enhance autonomy and latitude for children in need of special support. This may be of even greater importance for the participants with Swedish as their second language. To participate in musicking and to learn music creates a sense of ownership that is of great importance for the individual not only from an educational, but also from a democratic perspective.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17582 (URN)
Conference
The 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. & Clausson, E. (Eds.). (2017). Barnsliga sammanhang: forskning om barns och ungdomars hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet. Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barnsliga sammanhang: forskning om barns och ungdomars hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet
2017 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

I forskningsmiljön Children’s and Young People’s Health in Social Context,CYPHiSCO, förenar forskare vid Högskolan Kristianstad sitt intresse för barns, tonåringars och unga vuxnas psykiska och fysiska hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet. I CYPHiSCO bedrivs både grundforskning om faktorer som står i samband med hälsa och tillämpad forskning såsom aktionsforskning eller utvärderingar av preventionsprogram. I denna bok har vi samlat några av forskningsmiljöns aktuella forskningsprojekt. Ett genomgående tema är hur barns och ungas delaktighet och handlingsutrymme utgör viktiga aspekter av deras hälsa och välbefinnande, något som i boken ses ur ett salutogentperspektiv.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press, 2017. p. 127
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16758 (URN)9789187973178 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. (2017). Den livsviktiga musiken: delaktighet, hälsa och funktionsmöjligheter (5ed.). In: Bo Nilsson & Eva Clausson (Ed.), Barnsliga sammanhang: forskning om barns och ungdomars hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet (pp. 65-77). Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den livsviktiga musiken: delaktighet, hälsa och funktionsmöjligheter
2017 (Swedish)In: Barnsliga sammanhang: forskning om barns och ungdomars hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet / [ed] Bo Nilsson & Eva Clausson, Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press , 2017, 5, p. 65-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Det estetiska området har visat sig viktigt för människors möjlighet att uttrycka sig och kommunicera med andra. Förmåga till socialt och kulturellt deltagande har stor betydelse för individens hälsa och välbefinnande. Intresset för att undersöka och utveckla estetiska aktiviteter för barn och unga med olika slag av funktionsnedsättning måste dock anses vara ganska begränsat, något som står i kontrast till den betydelse som ofta uttrycks i skrivelser och styrdokument. I detta kapitel kommer jag att, med exempel från några olika musikprojekt, diskutera delaktighet, hälsa och möjligheter i relation till musikaliska aktiviteter hos barn och unga med funktionsnedsättning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press, 2017 Edition: 5
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16841 (URN)978-91-87973-17-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. (2017). Musicking and technology: a further Swedish perspective. In: S. Alex Ruthmann, Roger Mantie (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of technology and music education: (pp. 241-248). New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musicking and technology: a further Swedish perspective
2017 (English)In: The Oxford handbook of technology and music education / [ed] S. Alex Ruthmann, Roger Mantie, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 241-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Computers and digital instruments change the way we think about ourselves and other people, demonstrated by an example with a girl who imagined that she had a computer in her brain where she could click on “Music” in the menu to hear music. This chapter argues that good music technology should allow play and unpredictable events and support a balance between challenge and ability. Digital instruments should also make it possible to revise and develop musical compositions.

Musicking and music creation with digital tools may be vital for children and young people in need of special support, although many children would use any tool available, including their own imagination and fantasy. Musical activities are closely related to play and flow and have measurable biological effects, which makes musicking not only a matter of aesthetics and learning, but also of health and well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
creativity, digital instruments, flow, health, musicking, play, tools, well-being
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14673 (URN)9780199372133 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. & Uddholm, M. (2017). Narratives about music and health. In: Absctracts: senior research: NNMPF 2017: the 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017. Paper presented at The 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017 (pp. 58).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives about music and health
2017 (English)In: Absctracts: senior research: NNMPF 2017: the 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017, 2017, p. 58-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Music is used in many professional contexts that are not associated, in a traditional sense, with either music therapy or music education. How do professionals in different contexts use music, and how do they describe their thoughts about music in their professional work? Those are the main questions in our inquiry, focusing on narratives about music and health in professional relations.

In this presentation, results from a pilot study where six strategically chosen participants from Sweden and Denmark were interviewed, will be presented and discussed. The pilot study was inspired by ethnographic methods and conducted to develop a research design for further research in this area.

Our study is based on the assumption that individuals will establish a relationship with music, regardless of the presence of professional music therapists, community musicians or music educators (Ruud, 2008; Bonde, 2011; Nilsson, 2013; Uddholm, 2012). Furthermore, experience from the field provides evidence that music occurs in various professional relations other than those involving music therapists or music educators, such as: with clients, students, children, elder people; among nurses, deacons, social workers, preschools teachers or care assistants. The field of Music and Health is not necessarily about illness or care, but can as well be understood as an aspect of quality of life. The unique position of music as an aesthetic expression among youth also makes the democratic aspect of music, especially important.

Previous research in this area has often been conducted within music therapy, many times based on biological and neuropsychological explanations of human behaviour in relation to music (Ruud, 2008). Therefore, we find it relevant in our research to investigate narratives from, and by, all kinds of professionals who use music in their practices.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17583 (URN)
Conference
The 22nd annual conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. & Uddholm, M. (2017). Narratives about music and health. In: : . Paper presented at The 10th International Conference for Research in Music Education, April 24-27 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives about music and health
2017 (English)Conference paper (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-17835 (URN)
Conference
The 10th International Conference for Research in Music Education, April 24-27 2017
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. & Westberg, I. (2016). I can play!: digitally based musicking with children in need of special support. In: : . Paper presented at 32nd World Conference International Society for Music Education, Glasgow, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I can play!: digitally based musicking with children in need of special support
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

I Can Play! -– Digitally- based musicking with children in need of special supportThis presentation highlights preliminary results from an ongoing action research project in a Swedish primary school. The aim of the project is to develop and test digitally-based musical settings with young children in need of special support. Computers, iPads and synthesizers were used in order to facilitate for the ability of children with physical impairments to perform and create music, alone or in small groups.The theoretical background of the project is to be found in sociocultural educational theories, health theories and musicology. To engage in musicking is to take part in any kind of musical events such as performing, listening, practising or providing material for musical activities. The Zone of Proximal Development describes how the learner with guidance can develop improve his or her social interaction with more competent peers. Physical and psychological tools mediate the world to individuals engaged in practical activities such as musicking.The research method can be described asis a form of action research, inspired by ethnographical methods and performed in collaboration between a music educator and the researcher, inspired by ethnographical methods. Data was collected mainly through participant observations and field notes. Passages of from audio- and video -recordings and field notes were transcribed and analyzed by the researcher and the music educator using a qualitative methodology.The preliminary results of the study demonstrate that even very young children are quite capable to of handling different digitally-based instruments and quickly learn how to use these them for playing and creating music. Open-ended apps seemed to catch the participants’ interest, whereas participants in some cases they soon lost interest in ‘ready-made’ apps. Some of the participants developed improved their musical knowledge using a combination of FigureNotes and digital instruments. Singing into an app with Aauto-Tune inspired the children to sing and use their voices in new ways.The results of the study implicates that a musical setting should be regarded as a combination of cultural, musical, technical, physical, psychological and personal resources. The explored digital tools for performing and creating music that were explored were found to enhance autonomy and latitude with for children in need of special support. This might possibly may be of even greater importance for those of the participating children with who had Swedish as their a second language. Playing music means learning, mastering and developing relationships with music, technology and certainly with other musicians. Furthermore, tTo participate in musicking and to learn music also creates a sense of ownership that holds is of great importance for the individual not only from an educational, but also from a democratic perspective.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16098 (URN)
Conference
32nd World Conference International Society for Music Education, Glasgow, UK
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. & Kaikkonen, M. (2014). Including Music For All: Music Networking In The Nordic Countries. In: : Music in Special Education and Music Therapy. Paper presented at International Society for Music Education World Conference 2014, Curitiba, Brazil, July 16-19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Including Music For All: Music Networking In The Nordic Countries
2014 (English)In: : Music in Special Education and Music Therapy, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13386 (URN)
Conference
International Society for Music Education World Conference 2014, Curitiba, Brazil, July 16-19
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2015-01-15Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. (2014). Performance and participation: a qualitative study of music education practices in digitally-based musicking with young people with physical impairments. Approaches: Music Therapy & Special Music Education, 6(1), 19-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance and participation: a qualitative study of music education practices in digitally-based musicking with young people with physical impairments
2014 (English)In: Approaches: Music Therapy & Special Music Education, ISSN 1791-9622, E-ISSN 1791-9622, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article highlights results from a research study of ‘Music Week’; a one-week Swedish music project performed at a Swedish folk high school, a Nordic-style residential adult education college. The aim of the Music Week project was to enable young people with physical impairments to take part in musical activities. Digitally-based musical settings were used in order to provide tools for both performing and creating music. The Music Week project was part of a larger 3-year music project.

The main purpose of the present research study was both to explore the interaction and the music education practices applied during the Music Week project as well as to explore the musical settings used within the project. The research method was partially inspired by ethnographical methods. In the study, two main variations of teaching music in groups were identified: i) Performance-oriented, with a clear goal of performing songs for an audience and ii) Participatory-oriented, where the participants were able to explore their potential to play and create music. Furthermore, the results suggest that musical settings should be regarded in a holistic way to include all kinds of resources: musical, technical, physical, psychological and personal.

Keywords
musicking, music education, accessibility, digital music instruments, impairment, health promotion, interaction, cultural awareness, young people
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11563 (URN)
Available from: 2013-12-29 Created: 2013-12-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, B. (2014). Performance And Participation: Music Education Practices In Musicking With Young People With Physical Impairments. In: Abstracts: 31st ISME World Conference on Music Education. Paper presented at ISME 2014 World Conference on Music Education Porto Alegre, Brazil, 20-25 July 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance And Participation: Music Education Practices In Musicking With Young People With Physical Impairments
2014 (English)In: Abstracts: 31st ISME World Conference on Music Education, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This presentation highlights results from a research study of ‘Music Week’; a one-week Swedish music project. The aim of the ‘Music Week’ project was to enable young people with physical impairments to take part in musical activities. Digitally-based musical settings were used in order to provide tools for performing and creating music. The main purpose of the present research study was to explore the interaction and the music education practices applied during the Music Week project as well as to investigate the musical settings used within the project.

The theoretical background of the project is to be found in sociocultural-based educational theories, health theories such as the Sense of Coherence framework and theories associated with music therapy and musicology. To ‘music’ is to take part in musical events in any capacity, e.g. by performing, listening, practising or providing material for ‘musicking’. Furthermore, music, music making and music creation will always promote health even when this might not be the specific aim. The present research project, however, was performed primarily from an educational perspective.

The research method was partially inspired by ethnographical methods where the author participated as a researcher through participant observations. The collected data were analyzed using a qualitative methodology. Passages of audio- and video-recordings related to the research questions were transcribed and coded.

In the study, two main variations of teaching music in groups were identified: i) Performance-oriented, with a stated goal to perform songs for an audience and ii) Participatory-oriented, where the participants were able to explore their potential to play and create music. The two identified variations of music education practices should not be regarded as mutually exclusive: it was shown that one musical situation often had qualities that applied to more than one practice. Also, the musical experience and competence of the tutor/teacher affected the collaborative music making.

The results of the present study imply that a performance-oriented, practise may fulfil the teacher’s intentions at the cost of interaction, inclusion and creativity while participatory-oriented musicking might facilitate creativity and improvisation. The result also suggests that musical settings should consider all kinds of resources: musical, technical, physical, psychological and personal. This result supports a holistic view of the individual and a focus on function rather than impairment.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13384 (URN)
Conference
ISME 2014 World Conference on Music Education Porto Alegre, Brazil, 20-25 July 2014
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2015-01-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2766-5235

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