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Andersson, Anders-Petter
Publikasjoner (10 av 21) Visa alla publikasjoner
Cappelen, B. & Andersson, A.-P. (2014). Designing four generations of 'Musicking Tangibles'. In: Stensæth, Karette (Ed.), Music, Health, Technology and Design: (pp. 1-20). Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Designing four generations of 'Musicking Tangibles'
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, s. 1-20Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

n this article we present a novel approach for the understanding and the design of interactive health improving music technology, what we call Musicking Tangibles. The Musicking Tangibles approach represents an alternative approach to the traditional instrument, interface and switch-oriented music technology perspective. Our approach combines a humanistic, resource and empowerment oriented health approach with an aesthetic and culture based design approach towards music technology. We present four empowering and health improving qualities for the Musicking Tangibles. These qualities emphasize to: 1) Continually evoke interest and positive emotions relevant to diverse users’ interpretation of the tangibles and the situation; 2) Dynamically offer the users many roles to take, many musicking actions to make and many ways to express themselves; 3) Offer the users aesthetically consistent responses and build relevant cross-media expectations and challenges over time and space, consistent with their character; 4) Offer the users many relations to make: to people, things, experiences, events and places. Further we present and argue for some design solutions of the Musicking Tangibles ORFI, WAVE, REFLECT, and the POLLY World from the RHYME-project. In developing POLLY we have tried to put together as many design qualities as possible, to exemplify our view and current understanding.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music, 2014
Serie
NMH-publikasjoner, ISSN 1893-3580 ; 2014:7
Emneord
Tangible Interaction, Interactive Music, Music and Health, Musicking, Sensorial Interaction, Smart textile, e-textile
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13346 (URN)978-82-7853-094-8 (ISBN)
Prosjekter
RHYME
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-12-27 Laget: 2014-12-27 Sist oppdatert: 2015-01-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P., Cappelen, B. & Olofsson, F. (2014). Designing sound for recreation and well-being. In: Baptiste Caramiaux, Koray Tahiroğlu, Rebecca Fiebrink, Atau Tanaka (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014): . Paper presented at International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014) (pp. 529-532).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Designing sound for recreation and well-being
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014) / [ed] Baptiste Caramiaux, Koray Tahiroğlu, Rebecca Fiebrink, Atau Tanaka, 2014, s. 529-532Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we explore how we compose sound for an interactive tangible and mobile interface, where the goal is to improve health and well-being for families with children with disabilities. We describe the composition process of how we decompose a linear beat-based and vocal sound material and recompose it with real-time audio synthesis and composition rules into interactive Scenes. Scenes that make it possible for the users to select, explore and recreate different sound worlds. In order to recreate, the users interact with the tangible interface in different ways, as instrument, play with it as a friend, improvise and create music and relax with it as ambient sounding furniture. We discuss composition techniques for mixing sound, tangible-physical and lighting elements in the Scenes. Based on observations we explore how a diverse audience in the family and at school can recreate and improvise their own sound experience and play together in open and non-therapeutic everyday situations. We conclude by discussing the possible impact of our findings for the NIME-community; how the techniques of decomposing, recomposing and recreating sound, based on a relational perspective, could contribute to the design of new instruments for musical expression.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12933 (URN)978‐1‐906897‐29‐1 (ISBN)
Konferanse
International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-09-23 Laget: 2014-09-18 Sist oppdatert: 2014-12-07bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P. & Cappelen, B. (2014). Musical interaction for health improvement. In: Karen Collins, Bill Kapralos, Holly Tessler (Ed.), Oxford handbook of interactive audio: (pp. 247-262). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Musical interaction for health improvement
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Oxford handbook of interactive audio / [ed] Karen Collins, Bill Kapralos, Holly Tessler, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014, s. 247-262Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

During the past decade, tangible sensor technologies have matured and become less expensive and easier to use, leading to an explosion of innovative musical designs within video games, smartphone applications, and interactive art installations. Interactive audio has become an important design quality in commercially successful games like Guitar Hero , and a range of mobile phone applications motivating people to interact, play, dance, and collaborate with music. Parallel to the game, phone, and art scenes, an area of music and health research has grown, showing the positive results of using music to promote health and wellbeing in everyday situations and for a broad range of people, from children and elderly to people with psychological and physiological disabilities. Both quantitative medical and ecological humanistic research show that interaction with music can improve health, through music’s ability to evoke feelings, motivate people to interact, master, and cope with difficult situations, create social relations and experience shared meaning. Only recently, however, the music and health field has started to take interest in interactive audio, based on computer-mediated technologies’ potential for health improvement. Here, we show the potential of using interactive audio in what we call interactive musicking in the computer-based interactive environment Wave. Interactive musicking is based on musicologist Christopher Small’s concept “musicking”, meaning any form of relation-building that occurs between people, and people and things, related to activities that include music. For instance, musicking includes dancing, listening, and playing with music (in professional contexts and in amateur, everyday contexts). We have adapted the concept of "musicking" on the design of computer-based musical devices. The context for this chapter is the research project RHYME. RHYME is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Centre for Music and Health at the Norwegian Academy of Music, the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), and Informatics at the University of Oslo. Our target group is families with children with severe disabilities. Our goal is to improve health and wellbeing in the families through everyday musicking activities in interactive environments. Our research approach is to use knowledge from music and health research, musical composition and improvisation, musical action research, musicology, music sociology, and soundscape studies, when designing the tangible interactive environments. Our focus here is interaction design and composition strategies, following research-by-design methodology, creating interactive musicking environments. We describe the research and design of the interactive musicking environment Wave, based on video documentation, during a sequence of actions. Our findings suggest some interactive audio design strategies to improve health. We base the design strategies on musical actions performed while playing an instrument, such as impulsive or iterative hitting, or sustainable stroking of an instrument. Musical actions like these can also be used for musicking in everyday contexts, creating direct sound responses to evoke feelings that create expectations and confirm interactions. In opposition to a more control-oriented, instrument and interface perspective, we argue that musical variation and narrative models can be used to design interactive audio, where the audio is seen as an actor taking many different roles, as instrument, co-musician, toy, etc. In this way, the audio and the interactive musicking environments will change over time, answering with direct response, as well as nose-thumbing and changing response, motivating creation, play, and social interaction. Musical variation can also be used to design musical backgrounds and soundscapes that can be used for creating layers of ambience. These models create a safe environment and contribute to shared meaning.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014
Serie
Oxford Handbooks Series
Emneord
music, composition, tactile, tangible, interaction design, health, wellbeing, art, multi sensory, computer, game, co-creation, musik, komposition, taktil, e-textil, interaktionsdesign, hälsa, livskvalitet, konst, multisenosorisk, dataspel, spel, medskapare
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-8036 (URN)978-0-19-979722-6 (ISBN)
Prosjekter
Interactive Music CompositionInteractive Sound DesignRHYME.no, The Research Council of Norway
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-05-09 Laget: 2011-05-09 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-12bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P. & Cappelen, B. (2014). Vocal and tangible interaction in RHYME. In: Stensæth, Karette (Ed.), Music, Health, Technology and Design: (pp. 21-38). Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Vocal and tangible interaction in RHYME
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, s. 21-38Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for Information and Communication Technology (ICT), due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the fields of Assistive Technology, Health Technology and Universal Design. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our on-going research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use, can reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music, 2014
Serie
NMH-publikasjoner, ISSN 1893-3580 ; 2014:7
Emneord
Interactive Music, Music and Health, Music Therapy, Tangible Interaction, Multisensorial
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13345 (URN)9788278530948 (ISBN)
Prosjekter
RHYME
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-12-27 Laget: 2014-12-27 Sist oppdatert: 2015-01-14bibliografisk kontrollert
Persson, H., Gustavsson, J., Olson, A. & Andersson, A.-P. (2013). B.E.A.C.O.N. - Beacon Emits Audio from Color, Or Not. In: : . Paper presented at 9th Student Interaction Design Research conference (SIDeR).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>B.E.A.C.O.N. - Beacon Emits Audio from Color, Or Not
2013 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

People who suffer from dementia are often isolated due to lack of ways of communication. In many cases verbal communication can be difficult to perform at all. We created Beacon with the goal to let people with dementia interact with a very simple and intuitive control interface to give them a means of non-verbal communication, and let them take control over the soundscapes that Beacon is capable of producing. In this paper we describe our concept Beacon, its physical form and how the design makes it possible for a person with dementia to control the software by moving around items of different colors and sizes on its surface to create synthesized and sampled sounds. We hope that Beacon will produce positive results among people with dementia, and that the interaction will be rewarding.

Emneord
interactive sound, interaction design, dementia, music therapy, color, real-time synthesis, openFrameworks
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-10483 (URN)
Konferanse
9th Student Interaction Design Research conference (SIDeR)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-05-06 Laget: 2013-05-06 Sist oppdatert: 2014-09-23bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P. & Cappelen, B. (2013). Designing empowering vocal and tangible interaction: . In: Kyogu Lee (Ed.), Kyogu Lee (Ed.), The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression: . Paper presented at The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression (pp. 406-412). Kaejeon, Korea: Seoul National University
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Designing empowering vocal and tangible interaction:
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression / [ed] Kyogu Lee, Kaejeon, Korea: Seoul National University , 2013, s. 406-412Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert) [Kunstnerisk arbeiden]
Abstract [en]

Our voice and body are important parts of our self-experience, and our communication and relational possibilities. They gradually become more important for Interaction Design due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible media. We build on the use of voice in Music Therapy and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Kaejeon, Korea: Seoul National University, 2013
Serie
New Interfaces for Musical Expression, ISSN 2220-4806
Emneord
Vocal, Interactive Music Composition, Musicking, Music Therapy, Assistive Technologies, Music and Health, Interaction Design, Music Technology, Health
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11176 (URN)
Konferanse
The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression
Prosjekter
RHYME.no, The Research Council of NorwayInteractive Music CompositionMusicalFieldsForever
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-10-19 Laget: 2013-10-19 Sist oppdatert: 2013-10-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Cappelen, B. & Andersson, A.-P. (2013). Towards an empowering tangible interaction design for diversity. In: Jeremy Myerson (Ed.), Jeremy Myerson (Ed.), Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design. Paper presented at Include Asia 2013. London: The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, The ROyal College of Art in London, Hong Kong Desing Centre
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Towards an empowering tangible interaction design for diversity
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design / [ed] Jeremy Myerson, London: The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, The ROyal College of Art in London, Hong Kong Desing Centre , 2013Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert) [Kunstnerisk arbeiden]
Abstract [en]

The seven principles of Universal Design, such as ”4. Perceptible Information” and ”5. Tolerance for errors”, are formulated from the design’s or system’s perspective. The principles focus on the qualities of the system or design, not on the value of use, the long time experience and use by many different people. Nor do the principles embrace a cultural and social understanding of the value of things, designs and situations. In this paper we argue for the necessity to broaden this narrow system or product design perspective, when designing to empower diverse users. Our field of study is musical and cross-media Tangible Interaction Design, where multimedia computer capabilities are included in everyday objects. Our goal is to motivate social and musical co-creation for families with disabled children to improve their health and quality of life. To extend our design thinking, practice and understanding of a design’s value, meaning and empowering potential, we build on a humanistic health approach, resource-oriented thinking, Positive psychology and Empowerment philosophy. In the paper we present and discuss how we design cross-media, interactive, tangible and musical things to motivate and empower a variety of users in our on-going RHYME project.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
London: The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, The ROyal College of Art in London, Hong Kong Desing Centre, 2013
Emneord
Universal Design, Tangible Interaction, Musical interaction, Multi-Sensory Environment, Empowerment, Resource-Oriented, Music and Health, Interactive Art, Media Art, Disability Studies
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11178 (URN)978-1-907342-70-7 (ISBN)
Konferanse
Include Asia 2013
Prosjekter
RHYME.no The Research Council of NorwayMusicalFieldsForever
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-10-19 Laget: 2013-10-19 Sist oppdatert: 2013-10-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P. & Cappelen, B. (2013). Vocal and tangible interaction crossing borders. In: Jeremy Myerson (Ed.), Jeremy Myerson (Ed.), Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design. Paper presented at Include Asia 2013. London: Helen Hamlyn Centre of Design, The Royal College of Art in London, The Hong Kong Design Centre
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Vocal and tangible interaction crossing borders
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design / [ed] Jeremy Myerson, London: Helen Hamlyn Centre of Design, The Royal College of Art in London, The Hong Kong Design Centre , 2013Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert) [Kunstnerisk arbeiden]
Abstract [en]

Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for ICT, due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the Universal Design field. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
London: Helen Hamlyn Centre of Design, The Royal College of Art in London, The Hong Kong Design Centre, 2013
Emneord
Inclusive Design, Music Technology, Universal Design, Musiccology, Voice, Interactive Music, Music and Health, Tangible Interaction, Interaction Design
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11177 (URN)978-1-907342-70-7 (ISBN)
Konferanse
Include Asia 2013
Prosjekter
Interactive Music CompositionRHYME.no, The Research Council of NorwayMusicalFieldsForever
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-10-19 Laget: 2013-10-19 Sist oppdatert: 2013-10-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Andersson, A.-P. & Cappelen, B. (2013). Vocal and tangible technology for music and health. In: Gro Trondalen (Ed.), Book of abstracts: setting the tone: cultures of relating and reflecting in music therapy. Paper presented at The 9th European Music Therapy Congress, Oslo (pp. 24-24). Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Vocal and tangible technology for music and health
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Book of abstracts: setting the tone: cultures of relating and reflecting in music therapy / [ed] Gro Trondalen, Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music , 2013, s. 24-24Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert) [Kunstnerisk arbeiden]
Abstract [en]

Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders like abilities, ages, locations, backgrounds and cultures. Voice and tangibility gradually become more important when developing new music technology for the Music Therapy and the Music and Health fields, due to new technology possibilities that have recently arisen. For example smartphones, computer games and networked, social media services like Skype. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with severe disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy and studies by Lisa Sokolov, Diane Austin, Kenneth Bruscia and Joanne Loewy. Further we build on knowledge from Multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible, sensorially stimulating interactive media, that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross- media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate body- voice connections, positive emotions and structures for actions. The reflections in this paper build on action research methods, video observations and research-by-design methods. We reflect on observations of families and close others with children with severe disabilities, interacting in three vocal and tangible installations.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music, 2013
Emneord
Interactive Music, Music Composition, Interaction Design, Tangible Interaction, Health, Music and Health
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-11174 (URN)
Konferanse
The 9th European Music Therapy Congress, Oslo
Prosjekter
Interactive Music CompositionRHYME.no, The Research Council of NorwayMusicalFieladsForeverInteractive Sound Design
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-10-19 Laget: 2013-10-19 Sist oppdatert: 2014-09-23bibliografisk kontrollert
Persson, F., Augustsson, T. & Andersson, A.-P. (2012). Effect tapper: interactive use of effects for musicians.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Effect tapper: interactive use of effects for musicians
2012 (engelsk)Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we describe a prototype development for an interactive effect for musicians. This project was made with members of the horn section in the band Damn! They are also performing together with the Swedish hip-hop act Timbuktu. The instrument we focused on was the trombone. The trombone is played without a strap and is held and played with both hands. You use it by blowing into its mouthpiece and regulating its slide brace with one of your hands. The trombone itself is a rather long instrument and since it is not attached to your body by straps, this attribute can be an advantage when designing an interactive effect. It makes the instrument interesting for using sensors to read its position and movement (Y-axis, X-axis, and Z-axis). One sensor that we in this paper argue for is the accelerometer which proved to fit perfect for this task. The result ended up as a prototype for what we call Effect Tapper – software that with the help of an accelerometer and a tap tempo pedal let you use an interactive and controllable delay effect. In the tests with trombonist Jens Lindgård of the band Damn! we show that the prototype improved interaction, his possibility to control the effect and become more creative when playing.

Publisher
s. 4
Emneord
Trombone, Accelerometer, delay, effect, tap tempo, sound design, movement, performance, interaction design
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-9858 (URN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-11-20 Laget: 2012-11-20bibliografisk kontrollert
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